self-fertilization

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self-fer·til·i·za·tion

(self'fer'til-i-zā'shŭn),
Fecundation of the ovules by the pollen of the same flower, or of the ova by the spermatozoa of the same animal in hermaphroditic forms; denoting an extreme type of inbreeding seen in certain plants and animal forms that produce both male and female gametes.

self-fertilization

(sĕlf′fûr′tl-ĭ-zā′shən)
n.
Fertilization by male gametes from the same individual, as by sperm from the same animal in hermaphroditic species or by pollen from the same plant.

self′-fer′til·ized′ (-īzd′) adj.
self′-fer′til·iz′ing adj.

self-fertilization

the fusion of male and female GAMETES from the same HERMAPHRODITE individual. Self-fertilization is fairly rare in animals (occurring, for example, in some snails and nematode worms) but is common in some plant groups. see SELF-POLLINATION. Compare CROSS-FERTILIZATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Inbreeding depression in partially self-fertilizing Decodon verticillatus: population-genetic and experimental analysis.
pisiformis tested in this study, but not tested by Zhang and Mosjidis (1995), is predominantly self-fertilizing ([PX.
varia was larger than that in the predominantly self-fertilizing species by more than 10%.
A polyploid that is self-fertilizing is more likely to spread in a diploid population because most matings will result in fertile polyploid offspring; outcrossing polyploids are more likely to produce inviable or sterile triploid offspring from 2x-4x matings.
Inbreeding depression in partially self-fertilizing Decodon verticillatus (Lythraceae): population-genetic and experimental analyses.
Gametic disequilibrium in the self-fertilizing slug Deroceras laeve.
Inbreeding depression studies on highly self-fertilizing species from a wide range of taxa are only recently becoming available, presumably because they are difficult to pollinate experimentally.
In our study, cumulative inbreeding depression was negatively correlated with selfing rate [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 2 OMITTED] and inbreeding depression in predominantly self-fertilizing species was 43% of that in outcrossing species (Table 1).
Predominantly self-fertilizing species in our survey ranged widely in inbreeding depression, from -0.
For the data based on three or four life-history stages, self-fertilizing populations had lower inbreeding depression at all stages except at growth/reproduction.
Populations in the lab and in nature consist of self-fertilizing hermaphrodites and rare males.
More is not better: Brood size and population growth in a self-fertilizing nematode.