self-esteem

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self-esteem

 [self es-tēm´]
respect for or pride about oneself; see also self-esteem enhancement.
chronic low s.-e. a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a longstanding negative self-evaluation or feeling about one's own self or self-capabilities.
risk for situational low s.-e. a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as being at risk for developing a negative perception of self-worth (situational low self-esteem).
situational low s.-e. a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a negative perception of self-worth in response to a current situation (specify).

self-esteem

(sĕlf′ĭ-stēm′)
n.
Pride in oneself; self-respect.

self-esteem1

the degree of worth and competence one attributes to oneself. See also self-concept.

self-esteem2

a nursing outcome from the Nursing Outcomes Classification (NOC) defined as personal judgment of self-worth. See also Nursing Outcomes Classification.

self-esteem

Self-worth Psychology The internalized sense of one's own worth

self-esteem

the totality of a person's evaluation of their worth as an individual. Also known as self-evaluation and self-worth.

self-esteem,

n the degree of worth and competence one attributes to oneself.
References in periodicals archive ?
The moderate correlation between the two self-esteems hints at a common core, while the distinction between God-centered self-esteem and self-esteem was quite clearly shown by the results from the CFAs, their different nomological networks, and God-centered self-esteem's incremental validity for depression, hope, optimism, and stress, beyond self-esteem.
The present study was conducted to develop and validate a God-centered self-esteem scale that assesses an individual's evaluations of the self in the context of God's love, availability, and ability to help.
Self-esteem is an important psychological construct that has garnered burgeoning amounts of attention in research from the 1960s to these recent times (Mruk, 2006).
Different measures for self-esteem exist alongside its various conceptualisations.
The ability to define and measure self-esteem has facilitated the study of relationships between self-esteem and important psychological variables that are significant in daily life.
Research in this regard has pointed to the idea that religious beliefs do impact self-concept and self-esteem.
This in turn allows for an added context in which self-esteem can be looked at, As spiritual identity entails the belief that the individual is an "eternal being and connected to God" (Poll & Smith, 2003, p.
Studies have shown relations between self-esteem and parental attachments (Laible, Carlo, & Roesch, 2004; Wilkinson, 2004), such that having close supportive relationships with parents is positively associated to self-esteem.
Taking all these into consideration, it would seem highly plausible that religious beliefs--mainly, beliefs about God, especially in His love, availability, and ability to help--may influence self-esteem, particularly when self-esteem is seen in terms of self-worth and self-competence (Tafarodi & Milne, 2002).
In addition to constructing a psychometrically sound measure, the present study also examined the notion that God-centered self-esteem and self-esteem are similar, yet sufficiently distinct from each other for practical utility.
Exploration of the distinctiveness of God-centered self-esteem and self-esteem was done using three approaches.
For instance, Lyubomirksy, Tkach, and Dimatteo (2006) attempted to differentiate happiness and self-esteem by examining the similarities and differences in terms of how different variables, such as global life satisfaction extraversion, and optimism, were associated with happiness and self-esteem.