self-effacement

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self-effacement

 [self-ĕ-fās´ment]
in bioethics, a virtue consisting of obligations of fidelity, or putting patients and their needs before the self-interest of the professional. Professionals give precedence or priority to the needs of patients rather than fulfilling their own needs; patients' interests take priority over the interests of others. Changes in the structure of health care have caused many stresses and divided loyalties for all health care professionals. Conflicts can be between the interests of patients and those of institutions, funding agencies, corporations, the state, and so forth.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lewis's skill, as Evans rightly notes, lay in "his sensuous and civilized descriptions, his poker-faced wit" and in his fluid, self-effacing style.
Unlike the self-effacing Tarbell, Brimelow overreaches with his rhetoric, distracting from and often obscuring his message.
The reason he was not inclined to engage in charming, self-effacing humor on this subject was that he was simply not willing to concede the point.
Behind many a great man stands a helpful, self-effacing woman, and no woman could be more self-effacing than Georgie, wife of W.
Uncharacteristically self-effacing for a blogger, Sanchez describes his Notes from the Underground (accessible at www.
Fairly soon, press stories appear about how the self-effacing official is actually an awesome figure of near-historic proportions behind the scenes.
To travel across India, as I have during twelve visits, is to get to know and appreciate the quantity and quality of the work done by Mother Teresa and her self-effacing nuns, many of whom come from India's finest homes and families.
And the self-effacing Depot is quick to point out that he did not actually initiate the suit drive.
In that endearing, somewhat self-effacing way, typical of her female protagonists, she explains.
Jolly, self-effacing, hut uncharismatic and unable to speak English, Calderon was viewed as crude compared with his predecessor.
Notting Hill (Universal Studios: 1999) Can an American superstar (Anna Scott) with Julia Roberts' megawatt smile find happiness with a shy British bookstore owner (William Thacker) with Hugh Grant's toothy, self-effacing grin?