self-discipline


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self-discipline

(sĕlf′dĭs′ə-plĭn)
n.
Training and control of oneself and one's conduct, usually for personal improvement.
References in periodicals archive ?
When adolescents perceive conflict between parents, their sense of emotional security becomes threatened and they exhibit poor self-discipline at school and home (Davies and Lindsey, 2004; Madigan, 2005).
The Buddha also said to the monks, "Vinayayo nama sasanassa ayu," which means "Buddhism exists because of self-discipline.
It is again self-discipline that creates positivity in you.
Your effort to create value for your dream clients--without demanding anything in return--is what will eventually bear fruit, but only if you exercise the self-discipline to create and share with them your ideas and solutions.
Self-discipline is what allows you to stand when inside all you want to do is run.
Chapter 4 presents clear student-centered steps and strategies to develop self-discipline.
It does indeed demand discipline as a route to self-discipline, but it can become a valuable part of our economic system, paying sensible wages and signing contracts to achieve targets.
Self-discipline is an invaluable trait, but so many lack it.
My view diverges from the perspective offered by Alfie Kohn in his article, "Why Self-Discipline Is Overrated: The (Troubling) Theory and Practice of Control from Within" (Kappan, November 2008).
To my mind, discipline, enforced if necessary, leads to self-discipline in later life.
Corporal punishment not only creates discipline but more importantly creates self-discipline, which makes kids say no to drugs, knives, violence, etc.
The psychologist said: "Learning magic requires self-discipline, an understanding of how other people think and an ability to entertain.