self-destructive behavior


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self-destructive behavior

any behavior, direct or indirect, that if uninterrupted will ultimately lead to the death of the individual.
References in periodicals archive ?
My Broken Palace is a social network focused on providing communal and individual support and interventions to youth who are engaged in self-destructive behavior.
Change Your Brain to Break Bad Habits, Overcome Addictions, and Conquer Self-Destructive Behavior
We introduce the idea that practicing self-acceptance is a more effective alternative to this type of self-destructive behavior," they added.
Emphasizing the importance of meeting students where they are, he offers guidelines on classroom techniques and school-wide policies for dealing with issues such as concentration and attention problems, self-destructive behavior, substance abuse, and perfectionism.
Don't expect smooth sailing in this memoir: Storlie doesn't gloss over either the details of his growth or the concurrent evolution of self-destructive behavior patterns and a relationship with difficult but ultimately supportive and loyal father.
Ferngren ignores the fact that demonic ailments could assume diverse forms, and not just erratic or self-destructive behavior.
Reading this book is like watching an automobile crash in slow motion, as the author engages in page after page, chapter after chapter, of self-destructive behavior, treating both herself and her husband abominably.
I wish our leaders would consider new drug policy characterized by: 1) The common sense to recognize that self-destructive behavior is not the same thing as criminal behavior; 2) the honesty to admit that our drug laws are not only a costly failure, but indifferent to human life and suffering; and 3) the willingness to learn from successes of European nations whose drug policies are compassionate and compatible with social progress.
It also extended current research by including a measure of self-destructive behavior.
It is my naive hope that limiting resources in the criminal justice system might force us to take a serious look at why billions of Florida taxpayer dollars have gone into investigating, prosecuting, and punishing what is little more than self-destructive behavior that centers on drugs and sex.
of Negev) and Lander (social work, Sapir Academic College) apply their experience and research to a series of therapeutic stories practitioners can use to develop a better understanding of life events, including loneliness, depression amongst young adults, facing catastrophe, considering suicide, social and school phobias, self-destructive behavior, suicide of one's parents, spiritual re-evaluation, social rejection in childhood, obesity, parental death through terrorism, eating disorders, trauma related to the Holocaust, illness and death in the elderly, terminal illness, immigration, and conflict between mother and daughter.
And even then, we discover, Joplin was a girl prone to self-destructive behavior.