self-definition


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Related to self-definition: self-contained, selves

self-definition

(sĕlf′dĕf′ə-nĭsh′ən)
n.
The definition of one's identity, character, abilities, and attitudes by oneself: work provided the primary basis for her self-definition.
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References in periodicals archive ?
If we haven't developed other self-definitions, if our roles in our family and our community are not robust, we lose a big chunk of ourselves in that transition to retirement," says Scott Bea, PsyD, a Cleveland Clinic psychologist.
Self-definition has been defined as the ability to establish and maintain "a coherent, realistic, differentiated, and essentially positive sense of self, or an identity" (Luyten & Blatt, 2013, 172).
The HGS contains two subscales, Self-Definition and Self-Acceptance, representing the two factors of gender self-confidence.
According to Rifkin, both the occlusion and hypervisibility of Native gender and sexual practices work together under Anglo-American imperial configurations to deny indigenous self-determination and self-definition.
Though the effect was found only among participants who considered technological innovativeness to be an important part of their self-definition, the researchers explain that other counter-stereotypical consumers may have influence in the marketplace.
These techniques revealed that performance was a function of motivation, self-definition, and willingness to participate, rather than the subject matter per se.
For Kokoschka and Schiele, the self-definition to which they were specifically committed was, primarily, to become artists of the first rank.
His struggle so far has been one of self-positioning and self-definition.
Since gender complementarity excluded women from the public sphere, Schlegel's novel constructs alternative possibilities for female self-definition in the private sphere, in the process radically expanding the boundaries of the feminine private sphere.
He creates a stream of constant self-definition and re-definition that rides up along the emotional highs of love, success, and pride and down through the lows of rejection, loss, and shame, while also opening the story to a host of literal spirits.
She shows that although the idea of chosenness has been central to Judaism and Jewish self-definition, it has not been carried to the present day in the same form.
The author's argument is that the Wycliffites had a different approach to defining the self than did the mainstream church at the time, and that that approach brought a crisis in the language of self-definition to the general Christian culture in England, which can be seen in some famous literary works of the time by non- or anti-Wycliffites: Chaucer's Parson's Tale, Gower's Confessio Amantis, and Hoccleve's Regiment of Princes.