self-control

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self-con·trol

(self'kŏn-trōl'),
1. Self-regulation of one's behavior in accordance with personal beliefs, goals, attitudes and societal expectations.
2. A person's use of active coping strategies to deal with problem situations, in contrast to passive conditioning strategies that do things to the person and require no action by that person.

self-control

(sĕlf′kən-trōl′)
n.
Control of one's emotions, desires, or actions by one's own will.

self′-con·trolled′ adj.

self-con·trol

(self'kŏn-trōl')
1. Self-regulation of one's behavior in accordance with personal beliefs, goals, attitudes, and societal expectations.
2. Use by a person of active coping strategies to deal with problem situations, in contrast to passive conditioning strategies that do things to the person and require no response.

self-con·trol

(self'kŏn-trōl')
1. Self-regulation of one's behavior in accordance with personal beliefs, goals, attitudes, and societal expectations.
2. A person's use of active coping strategies to deal with problem situations.
References in periodicals archive ?
To determine whether the content of the instructions was responsible for any changes in preference rather than the additional exposure to the schedules during the second session, a control group was given instructions that were consistent rather than contrary to their previous preference: Impulsive responders were told which alternative presented reinforcement sooner and self-controlled responders were told which alternative gave the greater amount.
For the group that received contrary instructions in Session 2, there were 23 participants: 11 impulsive, 4 self-controlled, 6 not classified, and 2 no-shows.
During the second session the instructions varied depending on the instructional condition that was in effect--Contrary, Consistent, or Elaborate Contrary Instructions--and the participant's categorization as impulsive or self-controlled (participants categorized as not determined received the same instructions as the self-controlled participants but their data were not formally analyzed and are not discussed further).
Under contrary instructions, the self-controlled participants received the following instructions in Part 1:
In the consistent condition, the instructions were the same as in the contrary condition but the recipients were reversed: Impulsive participants were told which key caused the tape to start sooner and self-controlled participants were told which key caused the tape to play for a longer period of a time.
The graph shows the mean choice proportions for the immediate, small reinforcer among impulsive and self-controlled participants in the second half of Session 1 (open bars) and in both halves of Session 2 combined (shaded bars).
Figure 2 presents the mean choice proportions in Sessions 1 and 2 for impulsive and self-controlled participants who received the elaborate contrary instructions.
Among self-controlled participants, there was virtually no change in preference from Session 1 to Session 2.
Thus, whereas choice in impulsive participants was modifiable by elaborate biasing instructions, choice in self-controlled participants was not.
However, the results of the delay-no delay group suggest that even if many immediate reinforcers are available, impulsiveness can be precluded if self-controlled responding is already occurring.