self-control


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Related to self-control: trustworthiness

self-con·trol

(self'kŏn-trōl'),
1. Self-regulation of one's behavior in accordance with personal beliefs, goals, attitudes and societal expectations.
2. A person's use of active coping strategies to deal with problem situations, in contrast to passive conditioning strategies that do things to the person and require no action by that person.

self-control

(sĕlf′kən-trōl′)
n.
Control of one's emotions, desires, or actions by one's own will.

self′-con·trolled′ adj.

self-con·trol

(self'kŏn-trōl')
1. Self-regulation of one's behavior in accordance with personal beliefs, goals, attitudes, and societal expectations.
2. Use by a person of active coping strategies to deal with problem situations, in contrast to passive conditioning strategies that do things to the person and require no response.

self-con·trol

(self'kŏn-trōl')
1. Self-regulation of one's behavior in accordance with personal beliefs, goals, attitudes, and societal expectations.
2. A person's use of active coping strategies to deal with problem situations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mischel's studies led him to draw further conclusions regarding the importance of self-control in reaching long-term goals and building lasting and meaningful relationships.
perceive their willpower or self-control as being in limited supply.
Self-report represents a useful and practical method for athletes and practitioners who want to identify key self-control behaviors that are vulnerable to lapses in self-control.
Since then, study after study has linked self-control to achievement in a wide range of areas, including personal finance, healthy eating and exercise, and job performance.
Psychologists from Toronto University in Canada gave volunteers self-control tasks in which they were asked to talk to themselves or keep their mind blank.
Self-confidence is also key in building self-control.
People who moved the cursor closer to the unhealthy treat (even when they ultimately made the healthy choice) later showed less self-control than did those who made a more direct path to the healthy snack.
The longitudinal NLSCYA dataset provides information on respondents' financial behavior in young adulthood in 2012 and their general self-control skill back in adolescence.
Self-control is often described as the conflict between the satisfaction of a short-term desire and the achievement of a long-term goal (Mann, de Ridder, & Fujita, 2013; Milyavskaya, Inzlicht, Hope, & Koestner, 2015).
The choice and self-control are among the topics of greatest interest for behavioral scientists.
In my humble opinion, sensible dieting and exercise are very useful to retain our health, but the single most valuable consideration to shape a fruitful life in our later years is to burnish our self-control over bad habits which might later destroy us.
Puwede namang hindi niya gawin 'yun, dapat niyang tigilan 'yun at kailangan niya ng self-control, Pascual said.