self-concept

(redirected from self-concepts)
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self-con·cept

an individual's sense of self, including self-definition in the various social roles one enacts, including assessment of one's own status with respect to a single trait or to many human dimensions, using societal or personal norms as criteria.

self-concept

(sĕlf′kŏn′sĕpt)
n.
The mental image or perception that one has of oneself.

self-concept

the composite of ideas, feelings, and attitudes that a person has about his or her own identity, worth, capabilities, and limitations. Such factors as the values and opinions of others, especially in the formative years of early childhood, play an important part in the development of the self-concept.

self-con·cept

(self kon'sept)
An assessment of one's own status with respect to one or several traits, using societal or personal norms as criteria.

self-concept

the totality of a person's perceptions or description of their self, typically not involving an evaluative component. See also self-esteem.

self-con·cept

(self kon'sept)
Individual's sense of self, including self-definition in various social roles.

self-concept,

n the composite of ideas, feelings, and attitudes that a person has about his or her own identity, worth, capabilities, and limitations.
References in periodicals archive ?
The qualitative data generated from this study are replete with examples of participants, given no direction other than to record their daydreams, gaining awareness of and insight into their vocational self-concepts.
Such "robust first-person perspective" presupposes the possession of a self-concept and is directly manifested in our ability to form so-called I*-sentences such as I regret that I* felt that way earlier on; sentences that express thoughts that have the subject itself as its immediate object.
Influences of internal and external frames of reference on the formation of maths and English self-concepts.
The PISA survey also asked questions about self-perceived abilities in different school subjects, from which three self-concept indices were derived and included in the PISA data set: self-concepts in reading, academics, and mathematics.
The BFLPE posits that students who are educated in high-ability classes and schools will have lower academic self-concepts (that is, knowledge and perceptions regarding academic ability--Bong & Skaalvik, 2003) than their equally able counterparts in average- and low-ability environments.
Catholic schools, in particular K-8 schools, may reduce the number of challenges students have to face upon entering junior high and help stabilize their self-concepts, academic self-concept in particular.
Similarly, the self-concepts of individuals who conceal positive information about their identities may be impaired.
Washington, Mar 9 (ANI): A romantic break-up does make an individual's self-concept vulnerable to change, according to a study.
Numerous studies have used multidimensional questionnaires which have shown that males score consistently higher than females (Marsh, 1998; Sonstroem, 1998) on physical self-concept.
Because the transition literature includes studies of both global and domain-specific self-concepts, this particular characteristic of the scale was important.
Children from cultures demonstrating behaviors that are valued in their culture but not necessarily valued in the dominant culture could easily develop lower self-concepts (Meggert, 2004).
Self-congruity is how much a consumer's self-concept matches the personality of a user of a brand.