segregation

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segregation

 [seg″rĕ-ga´shun]
the separation of allelic genes during meiosis as homologous chromosomes begin to migrate toward opposite poles of the cell, so that eventually the members of each pair of allelic genes go to separate gametes.

seg·re·ga·tion

(seg'rĕ-gā'shŭn),
1. Removal of certain parts from a mass, for example, those with infectious diseases.
2. Separation of contrasting characters in the offspring of heterozygotes.
3. Separation of the paired state of genes, which occurs at the reduction division of meiosis; only one member of each somatic gene pair is normally included in each sperm or oocyte; for example, an individual heterozygous for a gene pair, Aa, will form gametes half containing gene A and half containing gene a.
4. Progressive restriction of potencies in the zygote to the following embryo.
[L. segrego, pp. -atus, to set apart from the flock, separate]

segregation

/seg·re·ga·tion/ (seg″rĕ-ga´shun)
1. the separation of allelic genes during meiosis as homologous chromosomes begin to migrate toward opposite poles of the cell, so that eventually the members of each pair of allelic genes go to separate gametes.
2. the separation of different elements of a population.
3. the progressive restriction of potencies in the zygote to the various regions of the forming embryo.

segregation

(sĕg′rĭ-gā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of segregating or the condition of being segregated.
2. Genetics The separation of paired alleles or homologous chromosomes, especially during meiosis, so that the members of each pair appear in different gametes.

segregation

the separation of paired alleles during meiosis so that members of each pair of alleles appear in different gametes. See also Mendel's laws.

seg·re·ga·tion

(seg'rĕ-gā'shŭn)
1. Removal of certain parts from a mass (e.g., those with infectious diseases).
2. Separation of contrasting characters in the offspring of heterozygotes.
3. Separation of the paired state of genes, which occurs at the reduction division of meiosis; only one member of each somatic gene pair is normally included in each sperm or ovum.
4. Progressive restriction of potencies in the zygote to the following embryo.
[L. segrego, pp. -atus, to set apart from the flock, separate]

segregation

  1. the separation of HOMOLOGOUS CHROMOSOMES during anaphase 1 of MEIOSIS, to produce gametes containing only one allele of each gene. Such an occurrence is the physical mechanism underlying the first law of MENDELIAN GENETICS and is particularly important when the two separated alleles are different.
  2. an ability of bacterial REPLICONS to be partitioned accurately and evenly between daughter cells during CELL DIVISION. See par LOCUS.

segregation

the separation of allelic genes during meiosis as homologous chromosomes begin to migrate toward opposite poles of the cell, so that eventually the members of each pair of allelic genes go to separate gametes.

adjacent segregation
during meiosis adjacent centromeres segregate together.
alternate segregation
when diagonally opposite centromeres segregate together.
References in periodicals archive ?
15 and 16) that the shrinkage compensation with the segregation effect using small beads eliminates a minor deviation only.
While these bead sizes (11 and 85 [micro]m) have insignificant influence on the segregation induced shrinkage, the two largest sizes (156 and 203 [micro]m) have major influence on the segregation induced shrinkage calculations (Figs.
segr] [%] the segregation induced cross-flow directional shrinkage, [[PHI].
Finally, it should be emphasized that the deviation caused by the segregation effect is highly dependant on the filler size and content.
While the smallest filler (11 [micro]m) has a negligible influence on segregation, the largest filler (203 [micro]m) has significant influence (Fig.
The segregation effect of glass beads along the flow path during the injection molding process was evaluated.