segregation

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segregation

 [seg″rĕ-ga´shun]
the separation of allelic genes during meiosis as homologous chromosomes begin to migrate toward opposite poles of the cell, so that eventually the members of each pair of allelic genes go to separate gametes.

seg·re·ga·tion

(seg'rĕ-gā'shŭn),
1. Removal of certain parts from a mass, for example, those with infectious diseases.
2. Separation of contrasting characters in the offspring of heterozygotes.
3. Separation of the paired state of genes, which occurs at the reduction division of meiosis; only one member of each somatic gene pair is normally included in each sperm or oocyte; for example, an individual heterozygous for a gene pair, Aa, will form gametes half containing gene A and half containing gene a.
4. Progressive restriction of potencies in the zygote to the following embryo.
[L. segrego, pp. -atus, to set apart from the flock, separate]

segregation

/seg·re·ga·tion/ (seg″rĕ-ga´shun)
1. the separation of allelic genes during meiosis as homologous chromosomes begin to migrate toward opposite poles of the cell, so that eventually the members of each pair of allelic genes go to separate gametes.
2. the separation of different elements of a population.
3. the progressive restriction of potencies in the zygote to the various regions of the forming embryo.

segregation

(sĕg′rĭ-gā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of segregating or the condition of being segregated.
2. Genetics The separation of paired alleles or homologous chromosomes, especially during meiosis, so that the members of each pair appear in different gametes.

segregation

the separation of paired alleles during meiosis so that members of each pair of alleles appear in different gametes. See also Mendel's laws.

seg·re·ga·tion

(seg'rĕ-gā'shŭn)
1. Removal of certain parts from a mass (e.g., those with infectious diseases).
2. Separation of contrasting characters in the offspring of heterozygotes.
3. Separation of the paired state of genes, which occurs at the reduction division of meiosis; only one member of each somatic gene pair is normally included in each sperm or ovum.
4. Progressive restriction of potencies in the zygote to the following embryo.
[L. segrego, pp. -atus, to set apart from the flock, separate]

segregation

  1. the separation of HOMOLOGOUS CHROMOSOMES during anaphase 1 of MEIOSIS, to produce gametes containing only one allele of each gene. Such an occurrence is the physical mechanism underlying the first law of MENDELIAN GENETICS and is particularly important when the two separated alleles are different.
  2. an ability of bacterial REPLICONS to be partitioned accurately and evenly between daughter cells during CELL DIVISION. See par LOCUS.

segregation

the separation of allelic genes during meiosis as homologous chromosomes begin to migrate toward opposite poles of the cell, so that eventually the members of each pair of allelic genes go to separate gametes.

adjacent segregation
during meiosis adjacent centromeres segregate together.
alternate segregation
when diagonally opposite centromeres segregate together.
References in periodicals archive ?
invoke prophetic religion, segregationists turned to a discourse of
For a brief period in 1958-59 the segregationists had a wider political impact due to Faubus's states-rights shift, but they never believed that the governor was sincerely committed to their cause.
Lyon alluded to, the group of disfranchisers and segregationists who gathered forces in 1910 to promote the West Ordinance.
It turns out that thoughtful segregationists feared other white southerners as much as they feared the civil rights movement or the federal government.
Trent Lott's dismal remarks in honor of Thurmond's 100th birthday, especially Lott's stated regret that Thurmond's segregationist Dixiecrats failed to win the 1948 presidential campaign, led a number of writers to examine the Dixiecrats' old platform so as to put Lott's statement in perspective.
In the Civil Rights era, leaders of the Baptist State Convention of South Carolina, the state's largest white denomination, sought to persuade Baptists to accept desegregation, but they were frequently forced to retreat by vocal, black-belt segregationists.
In his political career spanning 40 years, Mr Wallace was elected governor of Alabama four times and in 1968 he united Southern segregationists and Northern working-class whites to win nearly 10 million votes, running for president on the American Independent Party ticket.
Their well-being depended on the maintenance of law and order, and in the South the threat of disruption came not from non-violent street demonstrations, but from militant segregationists who called for, and often employed, brute force against the freedom marchers.
In the bad old days some strict segregationists in the South wore buttons that read "Never.
In contrasting Little Rock's glorious place in the eyes of the world on Election Night with what is undoubtedly viewed by outsiders as the city's low point, we wrote: "It took a mob of dim-witted segregationists denying nine African-American children entrance to Central High School in 1957 to place Little Rock in this dishonorable light in the history books; Clinton's campaign has brought the city full circle .