segregation

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segregation

 [seg″rĕ-ga´shun]
the separation of allelic genes during meiosis as homologous chromosomes begin to migrate toward opposite poles of the cell, so that eventually the members of each pair of allelic genes go to separate gametes.

seg·re·ga·tion

(seg'rĕ-gā'shŭn),
1. Removal of certain parts from a mass, for example, those with infectious diseases.
2. Separation of contrasting characters in the offspring of heterozygotes.
3. Separation of the paired state of genes, which occurs at the reduction division of meiosis; only one member of each somatic gene pair is normally included in each sperm or oocyte; for example, an individual heterozygous for a gene pair, Aa, will form gametes half containing gene A and half containing gene a.
4. Progressive restriction of potencies in the zygote to the following embryo.
[L. segrego, pp. -atus, to set apart from the flock, separate]

segregation

/seg·re·ga·tion/ (seg″rĕ-ga´shun)
1. the separation of allelic genes during meiosis as homologous chromosomes begin to migrate toward opposite poles of the cell, so that eventually the members of each pair of allelic genes go to separate gametes.
2. the separation of different elements of a population.
3. the progressive restriction of potencies in the zygote to the various regions of the forming embryo.

segregation

(sĕg′rĭ-gā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of segregating or the condition of being segregated.
2. Genetics The separation of paired alleles or homologous chromosomes, especially during meiosis, so that the members of each pair appear in different gametes.

segregation

the separation of paired alleles during meiosis so that members of each pair of alleles appear in different gametes. See also Mendel's laws.

seg·re·ga·tion

(seg'rĕ-gā'shŭn)
1. Removal of certain parts from a mass (e.g., those with infectious diseases).
2. Separation of contrasting characters in the offspring of heterozygotes.
3. Separation of the paired state of genes, which occurs at the reduction division of meiosis; only one member of each somatic gene pair is normally included in each sperm or ovum.
4. Progressive restriction of potencies in the zygote to the following embryo.
[L. segrego, pp. -atus, to set apart from the flock, separate]

segregation

  1. the separation of HOMOLOGOUS CHROMOSOMES during anaphase 1 of MEIOSIS, to produce gametes containing only one allele of each gene. Such an occurrence is the physical mechanism underlying the first law of MENDELIAN GENETICS and is particularly important when the two separated alleles are different.
  2. an ability of bacterial REPLICONS to be partitioned accurately and evenly between daughter cells during CELL DIVISION. See par LOCUS.

segregation

the separation of allelic genes during meiosis as homologous chromosomes begin to migrate toward opposite poles of the cell, so that eventually the members of each pair of allelic genes go to separate gametes.

adjacent segregation
during meiosis adjacent centromeres segregate together.
alternate segregation
when diagonally opposite centromeres segregate together.
References in periodicals archive ?
of the white segregationist, a move exemplified by Lee's lead
East, always on the brink of bankruptcy, took the Klan and other segregationists seriously but delighted in making fun of them.
Their distrust proved justified when Faubus retreated from an adamant segregationist stance after the moderates won the special school board election in the spring of 1959.
Fourteen months ago, the then Senate majority leader, Trent Lott, praised Strom Thurmond (by then America's longest-serving senator), and bemoaned the lack of votes that had prevented the segregationist becoming president.
The White Knights burned black churches, and Tarrants, then unknown to the FBI, fired into the home of a black female activist in Meridian, The local chief of police, Roy Gunn, a one-time segregationist now working with the FBI, vowed war on the Klan to end the violence.
Draper points out that Ramsay struggled with his membership over racial policy, using his power to support civil rights despite censure by local unions and threats by the Ku Klux Klan and the white segregationist Citizens Council.
It often appears that seeking a clearer understanding of these stale phrase is as inconceivable as US Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall, a black man, standing on the floor of the US Senate and roaring his support for former US President Ronald Reagan's civil rights policies; or Senator Jesse Helms, a "former" segregationist, receiving a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Urban League, a paragon of excellence in race relations.
On two occasions, Senator Lott has publicly endorsed Strom Thurmond's (R-South Carolina) segregationist policies.
He provides a chronology of the cultural and political events significant to understanding the people and positions involved in the case's development, then details the events leading to Homer Plessy's arrest and trial on charges of violating Louisiana's segregationist 1890 Separate Car Act by sitting in a train car for whites only.
We heard about his segregationist history, but the issue was dead.
at the President, has an unpleasant history as an aide to a segregationist politician and defended the flying of a Confederate flag stained by the blood of slaves.