segregation ratio

seg·re·ga·tion ra·ti·o

in genetics, the proportion of progeny of a particular genotype or phenotype from actual matings of specified genotypes. The test of a mendelian hypothesis is the comparison of the segregation rate with the mendelian rate.

seg·re·ga·tion ra·ti·o

(seg'rĕ-gā'shŭn rā'shē-ō)
genetics The proportion of progeny of a particular genotype or phenotype from actual matings of specified genotypes. The test of a mendelian hypothesis is the comparison of the segregation rate with the mendelian rate.
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References in periodicals archive ?
2] populations (derived from crosses of resistant and susceptible parents) and BC populations were tested for goodness of the fit to different phenotypic segregation ratios.
The segregation ratios are presented in Table I for data that fit appreciates ([X.
Widespread distortions of segregation ratios have been reported in many previous studies of inheritance and linkage in bivalve molluscs (reviewed by Mcgoldrick et al.
It is apparent that Darwin, like so many others at the time, was unaware of the significance of the segregation ratios that Mendel recorded from his pea experiments.
The distribution of the segregation ratios in F1 progeny was used to compare with the expected.
The distribution of the segregation ratios observed in F1 progeny did not resemble the expected distribution ([alpha] = 0.