segregable


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segregable

(sĕg′rĭ-gə-bəl)
adj.
Genetics Able to undergo segregation: segregable characters.
References in periodicals archive ?
The court viewed the payment to the ESOP and the cash distribution to the terminating employee as "two segregable transactions,' not ineluctably linked,' and 'entirely separate' (General Mills, Inc.
2) For example, if a physician received meals and travel in association with a consulting fee, CMS will require that each segregable payment is reported separately in the appropriate category.
It in effect concedes that there are reasonably segregable, non-exempt portions of the records that are legally required to be disclosed," he was quoted, as saying.
If so, it is less clear the problems Jim raises are clearly segregable on a democracy approach.
Beyond identifying functional equivalences and spurious connections, viewing risk as a potentially segregable element opens the door to untapped design innovations.
With each, the agencies have committed themselves to recognizing and listing biological entities that are spatially, temporally, and/or genetically segregable from their wider taxa--but only insofar as those entities are "significant" to their biological species or subspecies (an approach some criticize) and are themselves at risk according to section 4(a)'s listing factors.
En este punto es correcto recordar la advertencia de Gonzalez Garcia: "La tecnologia no es autonoma en un doble sentido: por un lado, no se desarrolla con autonomia respecto a fuerzas y factores sociales y, por otro, no es segregable del socio-sistema en que se integra y sobre el que actua [.