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segment

 [seg´ment]
a demarcated portion of a whole. adj., adj segmen´tal.
behavior segment the smallest descriptive unit of a response to a stimulus.
bronchopulmonary s's the smaller subdivisions of the lobe of a lung; each segment is separated from others by a connective tissue septum and supplied by its own branch of the bronchus leading to the particular lobe.
hepatic s's subdivisions of the hepatic lobes based on arterial and biliary supply and venous drainage.
renal s's subdivisions of the kidney that have independent blood supply from branches of the renal artery, including the superior, anterior superior, inferior, anterior inferior, and posterior segments.
uterine segment either of the two portions into which the uterus becomes differentiated early in labor; the upper contractile portion (corpus uteri) becomes thicker as labor approaches, and the lower noncontractile portion (the isthmus) is thin walled and passive in character.

seg·ment

(seg'ment), [TA]
1. A section; a part of an organ or other structure delimited naturally, artificially, or by invagination from the remainder.
See also: metamere. Synonym(s): segmentum [TA]
2. A territory of an organ having independent function, supply, or drainage.
3. To divide and redivide into minute equal parts.
[L. segmentum, fr. seco, to cut]

segment

/seg·ment/ (seg´ment) a demarcated portion of a whole.
anterior segment of eye , anterior segment of eyeball the sclera, conjunctiva, cornea, anterior chamber, iris, and lens.
bronchopulmonary segments  one of the smaller subdivisions of the lobes of the lungs, separated by connective tissue septa and supplied by branches of the respective lobar bronchi.
hepatic segments  subdivisions of the hepatic lobes based on arterial and biliary supply and venous drainage.
posterior segment of eye , posterior segment of eyeball the vitreous, retina, and optic nerve.
renal segments  subdivisions of the kidney that have independent blood supply from branches of the renal artery, including the superior, anterior superior, inferior, anterior inferior, and posterior segments.
spinal segments , segments of spinal cord the regions of the spinal cord to each of which is attached anterior and posterior roots of the 31 pairs of spinal nerves: eight cervical, twelve thoracic, five lumbar, five sacral, and three coccygeal.
Enlarge picture
Segments of the spinal cord (segmenta medullae spinalis), comprising 8 cervical, 12 thoracic, 5 lumbar, 5 sacral, and 1 or more coccygeal segments; shown relative to the vertebrae.
ST segment  the interval from the end of ventricular depolarization to the onset of the T wave.
uterine segment  either of the portions into which the uterus differentiates in early labor; the upper contractile portion (corpus uteri) becomes thicker as labor advances, and the lower noncontractile portion (the isthmus) is expanded and thin-walled.

segment

(sĕg′mənt)
n.
Biology A clearly differentiated subdivision of an organism or part, such as a metamere.
tr. & intr.v. (sĕg-mĕnt′) seg·mented, seg·menting, seg·ments
To divide or become divided into segments.

seg′men·tar′y (-mən-tĕr′ē) adj.

segment

[seg′mənt]
Etymology: L, segmentum, piece cut off
a component, part, or part of a structure, such as a lobe of the liver or part of the intestine.

segment

Hepatology
A functional division of the liver, of which there are eight.
 
Vox populi
A part of a larger region, structure or the body.

segment

Vox populi A part of a larger region, structure, body. See Abominal segment, Bronchopulmonary segment, Cervical segment, Competitive segment, Diaphragmatic segment, Posterior segment.

seg·ment

(seg'mĕnt) [TA]
1. A section; a part of an organ or other structure delimited naturally, artificially, or by invagination from the remainder.
Synonym(s): segmentum [TA] .
2. A territory of an organ having independent function, supply, or drainage.
3. To divide and redivide into minute, equal parts.
See also: metamere
[L. segmentum, fr. seco, to cut]

segment

  1. a division formed in the cleavage of an egg.
  2. part of a jointed appendage or of a chromosome.see SEGMENTATION.

segment,

n 1., a section into which something may be divided.
2., a part of a larger structure delineated through arbitrary or naturally occurring boundaries, often corresponding with a spinal segment. Also used to describe single vertebra (i.e., as a “vertebral segment”).

seg·ment

(seg'mĕnt) [TA]
1. A section; part of an organ or other structure delimited naturally, artificially, or by invagination from remainder.
2. Territory of an organ having independent function, supply, or drainage.
3. To divide and redivide into minute equal parts.
[L. segmentum, fr. seco, to cut]

segment,

n a part into which a body naturally separates or is divided, either actually or by an imaginary line.

segment

a demarcated portion of a whole.

bronchopulmonary segment
one of the subdivisions of the lobe of a lung, sometimes separated from others by a connective tissue septum and supplied by its own branch of the bronchus leading to the particular lobe.
hepatic s's
subdivisions of the hepatic lobes based on arterial and biliary supply and venous drainage.
References in periodicals archive ?
It should be noted that there are lower and upper limits of rigidity of the coupling bands, corresponding to the cases of disconnected self-aligned segmentary bearings and rigid multi-lobe bearings.
As we know, these patterns were opposed to those observed among the Yumans as nomads, hunters and gatherers, organized into a segmentary lineage system.
64) Ultimately Hall concludes that "what needs to be noticed is the persistent way in which these specific, differentiated forms of 'incorporation' have consistently been associated with the appearance of racist, ethnically segmentary and other similar social features.
Lewis, "The Ogaden and the Fragility of Somali Segmentary Nationalism," African Affairs 88, no.
He adds that "[t]he genius of a segmentary lineage system is in the deterrence against conflict provided by the combination of collective responsibility and balanced opposition" (p.
As Christie aptly points out, the Inca were at the centre of a largely unified empire under a paramount ruler with a blanketing ideology while the character of the Maya evidence is much more segmentary in accordance with the scattered nature of their conquests and imperial holdings.
Differentiation can be structural, in terms of a functional, hierarchical or segmentary differentiation, (31) but also exists on other levels.
Based on the level of the renal artery ramification, it is known as the hiliar renal artery when it divides at renal hilium level and extrahiliar when the artery emits a segmentary branch entering the kidney's upper or lower poles before entering the hilium (Sampaio & Passos 1992).
Generally, there are two types of indigenous leadership systems among segmentary societies in the South Pacific: clan leadership in Melanesia and chief leadership in Polynesia (Strathern & Godelier, 1991).
Across central Africa, for example, many farming societies formerly defined themselves exclusively in terms of segmentary kinship groups without chiefs and without any material or social differentiation other than clan.
jkn], segmentary curvature (or ordinary non-metricity) [S.