sedate

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se·date

(sĕ-dāt'),
To bring under the influence of a sedative.
[L. sedatus; see sedation]

sedate

(sĭ-dāt′)
tr.v. se·dated, se·dating, se·dates
To administer a sedative to (a person or animal); calm by means of a sedative drug.

se·date

(sĕ-dāt')
To bring under the influence of a sedative.
References in periodicals archive ?
Start with sedately pretty Corona Del Mar State Beach, then make a quick jog south on Pacific Coast Highway to more ruggedly picturesque Crystal Cove State Park.
The calm composure and the placid voice of Dr Lakshminarayana Subramaniam is a bit of a deception - when his violin unleashes a relentless gust of melody in the quickest conceivable tempo and his fingers glide between notes in a tempestuous burst of agitation, you wonder whether this is the same person who spoke so sedately about the music he was going to play.
The 428i was as easy to drive sedately as it was to drive aggressively.
Sedately paced, most scenes are played with studied melancholy and underpinned by noodling guitars.
Stock markets - and the underlying funds our clients were invested in - did indeed rise and fall, but generally speaking they did it fairly sedately.
While Festy raged and blazed for two days at Spensley's Emporium, Sumday (One May) kicked off more sedately in the Westgarth Social Club with the softly spoken tones of Teesside indie-folk group General Sherman.
Suddenly the car began accelerating on its own as he drove sedately along a 60mph dual carriageway close to his home in Pont-de-Metz, near Amiens, in northern France.
at the university, said: "We were really interested to find out what expended more energy overall-attacking the stairs two at a time and climbing them quickly, or taking them more sedately one step at a time and reaching the top more slowly".
We were really interested to find out what expended more energy overall - attacking the stairs two at a time and climbing them quickly, or taking them more sedately one step at a time and reaching the top more slowly," the Daily Mail quoted Dr Lewis Halsey as saying.
My mother-in-law turned 70 last week and we held a gentle little bash at ours where family and close friends quietly chatted while nursing a glass of grog and nibbled sedately on the odd canape or two.
Whilst the race started sedately enough at a walk, as soon as one circuit had been completed, it was into trot, for the diehards remaining, canter was next and potatoes were seen flying all over the paddock.