sedate


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se·date

(sĕ-dāt'),
To bring under the influence of a sedative.
[L. sedatus; see sedation]

sedate

(sĭ-dāt′)
tr.v. se·dated, se·dating, se·dates
To administer a sedative to (a person or animal); calm by means of a sedative drug.

se·date

(sĕ-dāt')
To bring under the influence of a sedative.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fishing in Britain is known for being a sedate pastime, but that cannot be said of Nigeria's Abaji Fishing Festival.
I slipped it into the sedate end of the spectrum and never had to pay attention to shifting.
Sedate Trish Dawson explores outrageous possibility when she yields to a friend's makeup brush and transforms herself into a sexual siren for the night.
Any farmer will tell you that certain animals run around and are unpleasant, but when they're fixed then they are happy and sedate.
We often have to sedate patients because the muscles are in spasm, and the patients are in a lot of pain," says David.
With sedate economy, Van Clief-Stefanon delivers a composite distillation of the bitter fruits of patriarchy--highlighting what are often dismissed as incidental by products of more fundamental "human" struggles.
Viewed in visible light, the elliptical galaxy NGC 4261 looks positively sedate.
A far more sedate but no less significant event was the "Grupo de Amigos de Venezuela" meeting, organized by Brazilian President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva at the inauguration of Ecuadoran President Lucic Gutierrez in Quito.
According to the police, the suspects planned to invade Beckham's home, sedate her with a chemical spray, and hold her for ransom at a location in Brixton, South London.
Organizer Richard MacKinnon admits that the crowd is still fairly sedate and lacks diversity.
Once a week, the normally sedate midtown Italian restaurant II Campanello becomes a hothouse for tango aficionados.