secretory carcinoma

se·cre·to·ry car·ci·no·ma

carcinoma of the breast with pale-staining cells showing prominent secretory activity, as seen in pregnancy and lactation, but found mostly in children.
Synonym(s): juvenile carcinoma

se·cre·to·ry car·ci·no·ma

(sē'krĕ-tōr-ē kahr'si-nō'mă)
Cancer of the breast with pale-staining cells showing prominent secretory activity, as seen in pregnancy and lactation, but found mostly in children.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Chrissy Turner noticed a lump on her chest and tests confirmed she had secretory carcinoma.
The descriptive term secretory carcinoma, therefore, replaced the original designation of juvenile carcinoma.
Secretory carcinoma occurs in both children and adults with a wide age range from 3 to 83 years.
15) In male patients, secretory carcinoma may develop in gynecomastia.
In contrast to invasive ductal carcinoma, not otherwise specified, secretory carcinoma does not usually present as a distinctly spiculated lesion but rather as a discrete, lobulated, solitary mass with smooth or irregular borders, which may mimic a fibroadenoma.
Three salivary gland tumors have newly described, interesting molecular profiles that warrant discussion: mucoepidermoid carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, and a recently described tumor, mammary analogue secretory carcinoma.
A very recent article110 has described a new salivary gland tumor that histologically resembles secretory carcinoma of the breast, but occurs in salivary gland locations.
Similar to the namesake tumor in the breast, the salivary gland mammary analogue secretory carcinoma harbors a translocation between the ETV6 and the NTRK3 genes.
Mammary analogue secretory carcinoma of salivary glands, containing the ETV6-NTRK3 fusion gene: a hitherto undescribed salivary gland tumor entity.
Secretory carcinoma arising in axillary breast tissue is a rare event.
To our knowledge, invasive secretory carcinoma arising in ectopic breast tissue has not been described previously.