secretion


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Related to secretion: tubular secretion

secretion

 [se-kre´shun]
1. the cellular process of elaborating a specific product. This activity may range from separating a specific substance of the blood to the elaboration of a new chemical substance.
2. material that is secreted, such as sebum (the fatty substance produced by the sebaceous glands to lubricate the skin), saliva (produced by the salivary glands), and gastric juice (secreted by specialized glands of the stomach). The secretions of the endocrine glands include various hormones and are important in the overall regulation of body processes.

se·cre·tion

(se-krē'shŭn),
1. Production by a cell or aggregation of cells (a gland) of a physiologically active substance and its movement out of the cell or organ in which it is formed.
2. The solid, liquid, or gaseous product of cellular or glandular activity that is stored in or used by the organism in which it is produced. Compare: excretion.
[L. secerno, pp. -cretus, to separate]

secretion

/se·cre·tion/ (-shun)
1. the cellular process of elaborating and releasing a specific product; this activity may range from separating a specific substance of the blood to the elaboration of a new chemical substance.
2. material that is secreted.

secretion

(sĭ-krē′shən)
n.
1. The process of secreting a substance, especially one that is not a waste, from the blood or cells: secretion of hormones; secretion of milk by the mammary glands.
2. A substance, such as saliva, mucus, tears, bile, or a hormone, that is secreted.

se·cre′tion·ar′y (-shə-nĕr′ē) adj.

secretion

[sikrē′shən]
Etymology: L, secernere, to separate
1 the release of chemical substances manufactured by cells of glandular organs.
2 a substance released or eliminated. secrete, v, secretory, adj.

se·cre·tion

(sĕ-krē'shŭn)
1. Production by a cell or by an aggregation of cells (a gland) of a physiologically active substance and its movement out of the cell or organ in which it is formed.
2. The solid, liquid, or gaseous product of cellular or glandular activity that is stored up in or used by the organism in which it is produced.
Compare: excretion
[L. se-cerno, pp. -cretus, to separate]

secretion

The synthesis and release of chemical substances by cells or glands. Substances secreted include enzymes, hormones, lubricants, surfactants and neurotransmitters. Internal secretion is secretion into the bloodstream. External secretion may be into the intestinal canal or other organs or on to the skin. Compare EXCRETION.

secretion

  1. the process by which a useful substance produced in a cell is passed through the plasma membrane to the outside.
  2. the substance itself. Secretions are usually produced by gland cells, but may be the results of cell destruction as in SEBACEOUS GLANDS. Glands of internal secretion (ENDOCRINES) pass their secretions directly into the blood stream whereas glands of external secretion (EXOCRINES) pass their secretions into special ducts.

Secretion

A substance, such as saliva or mucus, that is produced and given off by a cell or a gland.
Mentioned in: Expectorants

secretion

substance produced by a gland

secretion 

1. The substance produced by a cell or organ (e.g. a gland). 2. Production by a cell or organ of a physiologically active substance. This flow out of a cell is driven by an osmotic pressure gradient across the membrane, which is created by active transport of one or more ion species from one side to the other. See active transport; ultrafiltration.

se·cre·tion

(sĕ-krē'shŭn)
1. Production by a cell or aggregation of cells (a gland) of a physiologically active substance and its movement out of cell or organ in which formed.
2. Solid, liquid, or gaseous product of cellular or glandular activity stored in or used by organism in which it is produced.
[L. se-cerno, pp. -cretus, to separate]

secretion

1. the cellular process of elaborating a specific product. This activity may range from separating a specific substance of the blood to the elaboration of a new chemical substance.
2. any substance produced by secretion. One example is the fatty substance produced by the sebaceous glands to lubricate the skin. Saliva, produced by the salivary glands, and gastric juice, secreted by specialized glands of the stomach, are both used in digestion. The secretions of the endocrine glands include various hormones and are important in the overall regulation of body processes. Secretion of milk is an essential physiological activity in all mammals. Secretion of tears in animals has a simple protectory function and has no overriding emotional involvement.
3. categories of secretion include apocrine, holocrine, merocrine, sebaceous, serous.

Patient discussion about secretion

Q. What's the secret to looking good and fit? My friend who regularly visits my beauty parlor became very slim within 3 months. To be honest I am jealous of her. What's the secret to looking good and fit?

A. the answer is that there is no secret. you need to be consistent with your eating and exercise.

Q. how do celebrities look so thin and beautiful? what is their secret?

A. and all sorts of liposuctions and esthetic surgery...

More discussions about secretion
References in periodicals archive ?
The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study compared secretion of insulin, C-peptide, and proglucagon-derived peptides and pancreatic beta-cell function in glucose-stimulated non-diabetic participants to measure incretin effect.
Activation of the T cells was assessed by analyzing the expression of surface molecules by flow cytometry and the secretion of cytokines by T cells and/or DCs by ELISA.
In keeping with this concept, secretion viscosity has been shown to influence effective secretion removal when various suction pressures were applied (O'Neal, Munro, Grap, & Rausch, 2007).
As type IV secretion can distribute genetic material between bacteria, notably antibiotic resistance genes, the mechanism is directly responsible for the spread of antibiotic resistance in hospital settings.
Some studies have indicated that with HFCWO tracheal mucus clearance rates increase secretion mobilization up to 340 percent in patients breathing regularly.
The secretion transport in the maxillary sinus begins at the floor of the sinus in a stellate pattern and extends upward and medially toward the natural ostium of the maxillary sinus.
2005]), but were not found in the stylocellid species; likewise undecan-2-one, 6-tridecen-2-one and 7-tridecen-2-one were absent from the secretion of Stylocellus.
What the literature shows is that 70% of patients respond to the somatostatin analogue with reductions in nausea, vomiting, nasogastric secretions, and pain.
The authors proposed that IPV increased secretion clearance which, unfortunately, was not measured in this study (Antonaglia et al 2006).
Chiron Corporation (Emeryville, CA) has patented compositions and methods for expression of heterologous mammalian proteins and their secretion in the biologically active mature form using a yeast host cell as the expression system.
During the secretion process, a sac, or vesicle, containing a cargo of molecules inside a cell moves to the cell's membrane and fuses with it.
The primary mechanism by which RA SF erode cartilage appears to be via the synthesis and secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs).