secretion


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Related to secretion: tubular secretion

secretion

 [se-kre´shun]
1. the cellular process of elaborating a specific product. This activity may range from separating a specific substance of the blood to the elaboration of a new chemical substance.
2. material that is secreted, such as sebum (the fatty substance produced by the sebaceous glands to lubricate the skin), saliva (produced by the salivary glands), and gastric juice (secreted by specialized glands of the stomach). The secretions of the endocrine glands include various hormones and are important in the overall regulation of body processes.

se·cre·tion

(se-krē'shŭn),
1. Production by a cell or aggregation of cells (a gland) of a physiologically active substance and its movement out of the cell or organ in which it is formed.
2. The solid, liquid, or gaseous product of cellular or glandular activity that is stored in or used by the organism in which it is produced. Compare: excretion.
[L. secerno, pp. -cretus, to separate]

secretion

/se·cre·tion/ (-shun)
1. the cellular process of elaborating and releasing a specific product; this activity may range from separating a specific substance of the blood to the elaboration of a new chemical substance.
2. material that is secreted.

secretion

(sĭ-krē′shən)
n.
1. The process of secreting a substance, especially one that is not a waste, from the blood or cells: secretion of hormones; secretion of milk by the mammary glands.
2. A substance, such as saliva, mucus, tears, bile, or a hormone, that is secreted.

se·cre′tion·ar′y (-shə-nĕr′ē) adj.

secretion

[sikrē′shən]
Etymology: L, secernere, to separate
1 the release of chemical substances manufactured by cells of glandular organs.
2 a substance released or eliminated. secrete, v, secretory, adj.

se·cre·tion

(sĕ-krē'shŭn)
1. Production by a cell or by an aggregation of cells (a gland) of a physiologically active substance and its movement out of the cell or organ in which it is formed.
2. The solid, liquid, or gaseous product of cellular or glandular activity that is stored up in or used by the organism in which it is produced.
Compare: excretion
[L. se-cerno, pp. -cretus, to separate]

secretion

The synthesis and release of chemical substances by cells or glands. Substances secreted include enzymes, hormones, lubricants, surfactants and neurotransmitters. Internal secretion is secretion into the bloodstream. External secretion may be into the intestinal canal or other organs or on to the skin. Compare EXCRETION.

secretion

  1. the process by which a useful substance produced in a cell is passed through the plasma membrane to the outside.
  2. the substance itself. Secretions are usually produced by gland cells, but may be the results of cell destruction as in SEBACEOUS GLANDS. Glands of internal secretion (ENDOCRINES) pass their secretions directly into the blood stream whereas glands of external secretion (EXOCRINES) pass their secretions into special ducts.

Secretion

A substance, such as saliva or mucus, that is produced and given off by a cell or a gland.
Mentioned in: Expectorants

secretion

substance produced by a gland

secretion 

1. The substance produced by a cell or organ (e.g. a gland). 2. Production by a cell or organ of a physiologically active substance. This flow out of a cell is driven by an osmotic pressure gradient across the membrane, which is created by active transport of one or more ion species from one side to the other. See active transport; ultrafiltration.

se·cre·tion

(sĕ-krē'shŭn)
1. Production by a cell or aggregation of cells (a gland) of a physiologically active substance and its movement out of cell or organ in which formed.
2. Solid, liquid, or gaseous product of cellular or glandular activity stored in or used by organism in which it is produced.
[L. se-cerno, pp. -cretus, to separate]

secretion

1. the cellular process of elaborating a specific product. This activity may range from separating a specific substance of the blood to the elaboration of a new chemical substance.
2. any substance produced by secretion. One example is the fatty substance produced by the sebaceous glands to lubricate the skin. Saliva, produced by the salivary glands, and gastric juice, secreted by specialized glands of the stomach, are both used in digestion. The secretions of the endocrine glands include various hormones and are important in the overall regulation of body processes. Secretion of milk is an essential physiological activity in all mammals. Secretion of tears in animals has a simple protectory function and has no overriding emotional involvement.
3. categories of secretion include apocrine, holocrine, merocrine, sebaceous, serous.

Patient discussion about secretion

Q. What's the secret to looking good and fit? My friend who regularly visits my beauty parlor became very slim within 3 months. To be honest I am jealous of her. What's the secret to looking good and fit?

A. the answer is that there is no secret. you need to be consistent with your eating and exercise.

Q. how do celebrities look so thin and beautiful? what is their secret?

A. and all sorts of liposuctions and esthetic surgery...

More discussions about secretion
References in periodicals archive ?
After glucose stimulation, the acute insulin secretary response (AIR[sub]0′~10′)[sup][9], I[sub]P/I[sub]0,[sup][5] and the area under the glucose curve of intravenous glucose tolerance test (AUC[sub]ins-IVGTT)[sup][10] were adopted to assess the first-phase insulin secretion.
01) resistin levels suggesting that fasting has an inhibitory effect on resistin secretion.
Next steps involve seeing whether the protein secretion patterns we have observed are predictive of IVF pregnancy outcome, he said.
Ulcers are not found in achlorhydric patients and almost always occur in patients with Zollinger Ellison syndrome which is characterized by very high acid secretion.
Annotine decreased mDC secretion of IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40 and IL-23 but increased the ratio ofIL-12p40/lL-10
It is likely that feed restriction results in suppressed GnRH/LH secretion by regulating the inhibitory or stimulatory controls of GnRH neurons.
No additional suction tubing was connected inline because the additional suction tubing length may contribute to variance in suction pressures, which could influence secretion recovery and removal.
Understanding the structure of the secretion system will help scientists uncover the mechanism by which it moves substances across the inner and outer membranes.
This modality also facilitates the opening of airways in patients with lung diseases with secretion problems, including asthma, cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
Thus, especially with respect to the scent glands of certain Dyspnoi (such as non-scenting Trogulidae), a possible change of glandular function and role may not only be indicated by a reluctance to discharge secretion, but also by a distinctly different morphological organization of glands.
Incidence and underlying etiologies of bronchial secretion in terminally ill cancer patients: A multicenter, prospective, observational study.