secrete

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secrete

 [se-krēt´]
to synthesize and release a substance.

se·crete

(se-krēt'),
To elaborate or produce some physiologically active substance (for example, enzyme, hormone, metabolite) by a cell and to deliver it into blood, body cavity, or sap, either by direct diffusion, cellular exocytosis, or by means of a duct.
[L. se-cerno, pp. -cretus, to separate]

secrete

/se·crete/ (se-krēt´) to elaborate and release a secretion.

secrete

(sĭ-krēt′)
tr.v. se·creted, se·creting, se·cretes
To generate and release (a substance) from a cell or a gland: secrete hormones.

secrete

See secretion.

se·crete

(sĕ-krēt')
To elaborate or release products of cellular metabolism (enzymes, mucus, waste products).
[L. se-cerno, pp. -cretus, to separate]

se·crete

(sĕ-krēt')
To elaborate or produce some physiologically active substance (e.g., enzyme, hormone, metabolite) by a cell and deliver it into blood, body cavity, or sap, either by direct diffusion, cellular exocytosis, or by means of a duct.
[L. se-cerno, pp. -cretus, to separate]

secrete (sikrēt´),

v to discharge or empty a substance into the bloodstream or a cavity or onto the surface of the body. The substance secreted is called a
secretion. Glands that secrete internally are
endocrine or
ductless glands; glands that secrete into a cavity or onto the surface are
exocrine or
duct glands.

secrete

to synthesize and release a substance.

Patient discussion about secrete

Q. What's the secret to looking good and fit? My friend who regularly visits my beauty parlor became very slim within 3 months. To be honest I am jealous of her. What's the secret to looking good and fit?

A. the answer is that there is no secret. you need to be consistent with your eating and exercise.

Q. how do celebrities look so thin and beautiful? what is their secret?

A. and all sorts of liposuctions and esthetic surgery...

More discussions about secrete
References in periodicals archive ?
The secreted nature of BRCA1 could also help explain the observation that pregnancy before age 20 mysteriously cuts a woman's risk of breast cancer in half.