secondhand smoke


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secondhand smoke

n.
Tobacco smoke that is inhaled by nonsmokers. Also called passive smoke.

secondhand smoke

tobacco smoke from the burning end of a cigarette, cigar, or pipe that is inhaled by nonsmokers. The American Heart Association estimated in 2001 that secondhand smoke was implicated in the deaths of 37,000 to 40,000 nonsmokers each year from heart disease and lung cancer. See also passive smoking.

Patient discussion about secondhand smoke

Q. Are throat nodulars caused by second hand smoke, allergy drip, and reflux. Also can chlorine and rust in water

A. Throat nodules, or also known as - vocal cord nodules, are usually caused by maximum contact between the two vocal cords. The cause of these formations are usually strenuous or abusive voice practices such as yelling and coughing. Persons who are often susceptible are those who use their voice constantly in a loud environment. Examples include teachers, cheerleaders, politicians, actors, musicians and singers. I am not sure I understand the question about chlorine and rust in water, I don't think these factors have a connection to vocal cord nodules. Other throat nodules can be cause by smoking (not as much in second hand smoke), alcohol or chewed tobbacco use.

Q. can i get lung cancer from second hand smoking? what is the red line amount? how long do i need to expose to a smoking environment before i risk lung cancer ?

A. Yes, second hand (or passive) smoking is indeed a risk factor for lung cancer. How much? It depends both on the environment of the passive smoking (e.g. to how many smokers one is exposed) and on genetic factors. Don't know about threshold, but it seems that the more you avoid it the better.

Q. can i get lung cancer from second hand smoking? what is the red line amount? how long do i need to expose to a smoking environment before i risk lung cancer ?

A. thanks dominicus.. hope our short explanation can answer your question, chocolat?

More discussions about secondhand smoke
References in periodicals archive ?
Breathing secondhand smoke or passive/involuntary smoking is as harmful as smoking.
Americans express far less certainty about the dangers of secondhand smoke than about actual smoking.
However, despite the great steps made, smoking remains the leading cause of preventable death and a deeply pressing issue for young victims of secondhand smoke.
Secondhand smoke causes numerous health problems in infants and children, raising the risks of more frequent and severe asthma attacks, respiratory infections, ear infections, and even meningitis and sudden infant death.
Based on the 2015 Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) Philippines, secondhand smoke exposure was highly prevalent at 86 percent in public places, particularly in bars and nightclubs.
With an alarming number of children still being exposed to secondhand smoke every day, working with the American Academy of Pediatrics to help educate physicians and parents and help curb exposure is an important step in our efforts to help deliver the first tobacco-fiee generation," Eileen Howard Boone, the foundation's president, said last month in announcing the grant.
Surgeon General which concluded that there is no safe level of exposure to secondhand smoke.
Declines in secondhand smoke exposure were observed across all population subgroups, however some disparities still remain, found the study, which is based on 19992012 data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.
Earlier, the Department of Health (DOH) noted in its Bulletin on Secondhand Smoke that cigarette smoke contains more than 7,000 chemicals which cause cancer, heart disease, difficulties in breathing, and other ailments.
ISSUE: The WVSMA seeks to reduce or eliminate tobacco use and exposure to secondhand smoke by West Virginia citizens, especially children and pregnant women.
The report found that the vast majority of respondents, around 90%, agreed that secondhand smoke can harm health, that parental smoking can harm health and that parents should not smoke in front of their children.
Researchers found that 26 percent of people exposed to varying levels of secondhand smoke had signs of coronary artery calcification (CAC), compared to 18.