secondary tumor


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Related to secondary tumor: metastasize, metastasis

secondary tumor

A tumor that has formed at a location remote from the original location of the tumor. Generally, a secondary tumor results from the spread of malignant cells through the lymphatic system or bloodstream.
See also: tumor
References in periodicals archive ?
This heterogeneity is characterized by a wide range of biologic, immunologic and biochemical characteristics, coupled with genetic instability, all of which make secondary tumors resistant to therapies.
Such secondary tumors can appear years later and are often more aggressive and harder to treat.
com/) Mitchell Gaynor , clinical assistant professor at Weill Cornell Medical College, told Medical Daily the most common secondary tumors spreading to the heart "come from the lung, from the esophagus, and you can also see them from the liver, and the stomach.
With careful monitoring, secondary tumors could be detected earlier, and, with appropriate intervention, might be better managed, without compromising survival.
Having a way to identify and shrink these secondary tumors is of utmost importance when fighting to save people with these diseases," Lewis said.
5,6) In their review of metastases of the digestive tract up to 1983, Caramella et al (7) found only 265 cases of metastases to the colon and rectum; this number included all secondary tumors by either direct invasion, dissemination by (or from) peritoneal seeding, or hematogenous spread.
Several interesting gene associations fell out of the analysis, including confirmation that the gene associated with neurofibromatosis (NF1) is associated with sporadic glioblastoma, and that mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) gene are associated with disease in younger patients and in individuals with secondary tumors.
Primary malignant tumors of the heart, such as angiosarcomas, also have the potential to embolize and cause stroke, as can secondary tumors such as lymphoma.
However, since most patients with secondary tumors to the larynx generally present late, management options are generally limited to palliative treatment.
About 70 percent of patients who develop advanced breast cancer have secondary tumors in the bone.
They were further able to pick out with approximately 80% accuracy those patients whose tumors had metastasized, causing nodal involvement and the often inoperable development of secondary tumors.
In several of the volunteers, this stimulated an immune response against secondary tumors and led to complete remission.