auxiliary storage

(redirected from secondary memory)
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auxiliary storage

a storage device for adding to the main storage of the computer, using such media as floppy disks, hard disks, compact disks, zip (a brand name by Iomega zipTM) disks, or tapes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tests of secondary memory should generally be positively correlated with extrasensory perception, but how well learned the material is (or strength of association) is an additional consideration.
This makes it appear likely that secondary memory was primarily being sampled.
Gambale (1976) and Gambale, Margolis, and Cruci (1976) also failed to confirm the effect, although they used a design that would have permitted participants to make their ESP responses after and separately from their memory responses if they chose, which would seem likely to bring in the problem highlighted by Irwin (1979) in mixing primary and secondary memory.
Summing up this last line of work, it appears that there is considerable evidence that secondary memory and ESP are positively correlated within the response, particularly when memory is not very strong, and that expression of the effect may be heightened by experimental designs that preclude the employment of primary memory and heighten the meaningfulness of the experimental situation by individual attention.
Here, the processors get the messages with the terms that require the next bucket, recover them from secondary memory, select the top document identifiers and send them again to the ranker with a cost of T + TDK + TKG + L.
The education effect was found to be greater for secondary memory and language (RT) tasks only.
With regard to the question of whether age or education level is the most significant determinant of cognitive change, the study suggests that over the brief time period examined here, education may have a more important impact on changes in secondary memory and language functioning, but that elsewhere age is the more important factor.
Elderly persons with a high level of education appear to show greatest resistance to change but only on tests with a high learned component--that is, tests of language and secondary memory.
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