secondary hypertension


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Related to secondary hypertension: primary hypertension

sec·on·dar·y hy·per·ten·sion

arterial hypertension produced by a known cause, for example, hyperthyroidism, kidney disease, etc., in contrast to primary hypertension that is of unknown cause.

secondary hypertension

elevated blood pressure associated with any of several primary diseases, such as renal, pulmonary, endocrine, and vascular diseases. Compare essential hypertension. See also hypertension.

sec·on·dar·y hy·per·ten·sion

(sek'ŏn-dar-ē hī'pĕr-ten'shŭn)
Hypertension with an identifible cause (e.g., renal artery stenosis, renal failure, stress, sleep apnea, pheochromocytoma, primary hyperaldosteronism, preeclampsia).
See also: hypertension
References in periodicals archive ?
Accordingly, it is valuable to review the current evidence regarding this important cause of secondary hypertension.
For example, secondary pulmonary hypertension can be caused by chronic obstructive lung disease (chronic bronchitis and emphysema), left ventricular failure, mitral stenosis, obstructive sleep apnea, pulmonary embolism, scleroderma, neuromuscular disease, and interstitial lung disease, Diagnosing secondary hypertension involves diagnosing the underlying cause of the hypertension.
1,2) Some drugs directly cause secondary hypertension (erythropoietin), whereas other drug classes (NSAIDs) usually exacerbate pre-existing essential hypertension.
About 10 percent of all hypertension diagnoses are secondary hypertension, which can be traced to a specific cause, for example, a narrowing of the arteries that lead to the kidneys, sleep apnea, insulin resistance, kidney disease, endocrine abnormalities such as overactive adrenal glands, pregnancy, and medications such as some oral contraceptives or estrogen-replacement therapies.
A: Yes, it is actually the most common cause of secondary hypertension.
For women with chronic primary or secondary hypertension, or with a history of pregnancy-related hypertension, Level A evidence supports using low-dose aspirin during the second and third trimester.
Utilizing potassium also points up the importance of differentiating primary and secondary hypertension.
Hypertension Diagnosis: Estimated percentage of patients with normal blood pressure or diagnosed with Prehypertension, Stage 1 Hypertension, Stage 2 Hypertension, Isolated Systolic Hypertension, Resistant Hypertension, Drug-induced Hypertension, Pregnancy-related Hypertension, Exercise-related Hypertension or other secondary Hypertension (specified).
Among the specific topics are age-related changes in the cardiovascular system, non-pharmacological trials, endocrine causes of secondary hypertension, the use of angiotensin receptor blockers in the elderly, attitudes regarding hypertension among older African-Americans, and the clinician's role in improving therapeutic adherence and blood pressure control in older hypertension patients.
Patients with recent myocardial infarction or unstable angina, heart failure, hepatic/renal disease, secondary hypertension, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, serum creatinine >1.

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