secondary hyperalgesia

secondary hyperalgesia

long-term tissue hypersensitivity beyond area of original injury; due to excitation of dorsal horn N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (see syndrome, complex regional pain)
References in periodicals archive ?
This stimulation led to secondary hyperalgesia, also known as enhanced pain sensitivity, common in burns.
The stimulation generated secondary hyperalgesia, or enhanced pain sensitivity beyond the site of an injury - a common feature of burns.
In such cases, local nociceptive excitation and peripheral sensitization may coexist with a state of secondary hyperalgesia, leading to diffuse pain experience.
A novel model of primary and secondary hyperalgesia after mild thermal injury in the rat.
Secondary hyperalgesia is thought to be a basis for chronic post surgical pain.
Primary hyperalgesia is defined as changes in the area of injury, while secondary hyperalgesia is changes to pain thresholds in the undamaged tissue surrounding the injury, which can become hypersensitive to touch (Campbell et al.
Preclinical work shows that ENT-103, effectively blocks nerve impulse conduction, has potentially long-lasting properties to reduce and manage pain, and may also be effective in relieving both primary and secondary hyperalgesia (pain hypersensitivity) caused either by injury or incision.
The most well known action is reversible NMDA receptor antagonism thought to be responsible for suppression of secondary hyperalgesia and central sensitisation.
These adverse effects include nociception-induced central sensitisation (3) and opioid-induced secondary hyperalgesia (4).
Preclinical work shows that ENT-103 effectively blocks nerve impulse conduction, has potentially long-lasting properties to reduce and manage pain and may also be effective in relieving both primary and secondary hyperalgesia (pain hypersensitivity) caused either by injury or incision.
Preclinical work shows that ENT-103 effectively blocks nerve impulse conduction, has potentially long-lasting properties to reduce and manage pain, and may also be effective in relieving both primary and secondary hyperalgesia (pain hypersensitivity) caused either by injury or incision.
Preclinical work shows that several of these compounds effectively block nerve impulse conduction, have potentially long-lasting properties to reduce and manage pain, and may also be effective in relieving both primary and secondary hyperalgesia (pain hypersensitivity) caused either by injury or incision.
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