secondary glaucoma


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Related to secondary glaucoma: primary glaucoma

sec·on·dar·y glau·co·ma

glaucoma occurring as a sequel of preexisting ocular disease or injury.

secondary glaucoma

Ophthalmology Glaucoma in a background of other ocular disease–eg, uveitis and systemic disease, or after exposure to some drugs–eg, steroids. See Glaucoma.

sec·on·dar·y glau·co·ma

(sek'ŏn-dar-ē glaw-kō'mă)
Glaucoma occurring as a sequel of ocular disease or injury.

glaucoma

a group of diseases of the eye characterized by increased intraocular pressure, resulting in pathological changes in the optic disk and typical visual field defects, and eventually blindness if not treated successfully. Uncommon in domestic animals, except in dogs where several breeds are predisposed.
The normal eye is filled with aqueous humor in an amount carefully regulated to maintain the shape of the eyeball. In glaucoma, the balance of this fluid is disturbed; fluid is formed more rapidly than it leaves the eye, and pressure builds up. The increased pressure damages the retina. If not relieved by proper treatment, the pressure will eventually damage the optic nerve, causing blindness.

absolute glaucoma
end-stage glaucoma with buphthalmos and severe degenerative changes.
aphakic glaucoma
forward displacement of the posterior lens capsule and vitreous body with incarceration in the pupil; usually occurs after cataract surgery.
closed-angle glaucoma
one in which the iridocorneal angle is obstructed, either due to collapse or interference with drainage by the iris or connective tissue. The cause may be congenital (goniodysgenesis) or acquired, due to an abnormality of the lens, anterior chamber or iris.
congenital glaucoma
that due to defective development of the structures in and around the anterior chamber of the eye, and resulting in impairment of drainage. See also goniodysgenesis.
narrow-angle glaucoma
a form of primary glaucoma caused by abnormal development of the iridocorneal angle. See also goniodysgenesis.
open-angle glaucoma
a form of glaucoma in which there is no detectable abnormality of the iridocorneal angle, but drainage is obstructed by elements in the aqueous humor, luxation of the lens, or elevated episcleral venous pressure. In some cases, particularly in predisposed breeds of dogs such as beagles, no contributing factors are detectable.
phacolytic glaucoma
leakage of lens material from a hypermature cataract causes anterior uveitis that impedes aqueous outflow.
primary glaucoma
increased intraocular pressure occurring in an eye with no other eye disease being present.
secondary glaucoma
increased intraocular pressure due to disease or injury to the eye.
References in periodicals archive ?
A total of ten patients required secondary glaucoma surgeries including four express shunt implantations, four trabeculectomies, and two Trabectomes at the opposite quadrant of the eye.
Incidence and risk factors in secondary glaucomas after blunt and penetrating ocular trauma.
During her many visits to Moorfields, Gabrielle became best friends with another six-year-old patient, Sabrina Malena, who was diagnosed with congenital irises - cysts on the iris - and secondary glaucoma.
306 WG = without glaucoma; GSG = glaucoma suspected group; POAG = primary open-angle glaucoma; PACG = primary angleclosure glaucoma; SG = secondary glaucoma Table 3.
Secondary glaucoma develops because of another disorder already present in the eye; that is, there is a problem within the eye which causes a disruption in the necessary drainage of fluid.
Uveitis of the anterior (front) of the uvea is more common and typically does not lead to vision impairment; while posterior uveitis (back of the eye) is associated with more severe outcomes that can include blindness, cataracts, secondary glaucoma and macular abnormalities.
II-51 Types of Glaucoma II-52 Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG) II-52 Acute Angle-Closure Glaucoma (AACG) II-52 Congenital Glaucoma II-52 Secondary Glaucoma II-53 Treatment Strategies II-53 Anti- Glaucoma Ophthalmic Drugs II-54 How Widespread is the Disease?
Trabeculectomy with mitomycin C has provided long-term safety and was effective in reducing intraocular pressure in cases with secondary glaucoma associated with BD.
sup][2] Angle closure was responsible for secondary glaucoma.
Observation of complications: Complications in the postoperative one month including hypotony hyphema secondary glaucoma choroidal detachment and uveal reaction were observed.
Some common causes of this serious secondary glaucoma are occlusive retinal vascular diseases such as central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO), proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO), inflammatory disease and intraocular tumours1.
5) Be able to evaluate risk factors to identify and detect secondary glaucoma and manage accordingly (Group 6.