secondary brain injury


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Related to secondary brain injury: primary brain injury

secondary brain injury

Brain damage due to cellular disruption, electrolyte disarray, inflammation, insufficient oxygen, or vasospasm after head trauma.
See also: injury
References in periodicals archive ?
The inflammation linked to OS following ICH indicates that neuroinflammation and OS are intercalated in ICH-induced secondary brain injury.
Failure to institute basic clinical interventions such as blood glucose level monitoring, intravenous fluid administration and supplemental oxygen will result in secondary brain injury which serves to exacerbate the primary injury.
sup][25] The apoptosis of neurons and glia is considered to be a vital factor in the secondary brain injury following TBI.
The main counter argumentation for the Lund Concept is the potential risk of hypotension, which could consequently lead to secondary brain injury and worse outcome.
After an initial brain injury, multiple factors including fever or hyperthermia can lead to secondary brain injury.
Secondary brain injury is maintained and worsened by intracranial and extracranial insults, the combined effects of which are multiplicative rather than additive.
The APRN goal is to "prevent or minimize secondary brain injury which occurs as a result of hypoxia, poor cerebral perfusion, cerebral bleeding, hypoglycemia, seizures and fever" (The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, 2013, para.
2] Management of TBI patients is rapidly evolving because of a greater understanding of the physiological derangements resulting in secondary brain injury (SBI).
The critical care nurse's role in preventing secondary brain injury in severe head trauma: Achieving the balance.
Secondary brain injury results from the ensuing inflammatory cascade, resulting in ischemia and cortical depression.
Today, ICP monitoring is ubiquitous in any neurocritical care unit or intensive care unit (ICU), where patients are at higher risk for secondary brain injury because of cerebral edema, changes in cerebral blood flow, and hydrocephalus as well as secondary ischemia from hypotension, hypoxia, hypocapnia, hypercapnia, and fever (Miller, 2012; Wolfe & Torbey, 2009).
In the critical care setting, the focus of care during the first few weeks following acute brain injury is prevention of secondary brain injury by optimizing cerebral perfusion.