secondary

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Related to secondary attack rate: case fatality rate

secondary

/sec·on·dary/ (sek´un-dar″e) second or inferior in order of time, place, or importance; derived from or consequent to a primary event or thing.

secondary

(sĕk′ən-dĕr′ē)
adj.
1. Second or lower in rank or importance; not primary: concerns that are secondary.
2. Of, relating to, or being the shorter flight feathers projecting along the inner edge of a bird's wing.
3. Being a degree of health care intermediate between primary care and tertiary care, as that typically offered at a community hospital.
n. pl. secondar·ies
1. One that acts in an auxiliary, subordinate, or inferior capacity.
2. One of the shorter flight feathers projecting along the inner edge of a bird's wing.

sec′ond·ar′i·ly (-dâr′ə-lē) adv.
sec′ond·ar′i·ness n.

secondary

[sek′ənder′ē]
Etymology: L, secundus, second
second in importance or in occurrence or belonging to the second order of sophistication or development, such as a secondary health care facility or secondary education.

secondary

adjective
(1) Not primary; generally referring to that which follows another linked process.
(2) Metastatic, see there.
 
noun A metastatic focus of tumour.

secondary

adjective 
1. Not primary; generally that which follows another linked process.
2. Metastatic, see there.

sec·on·dar·y

(sek'ŏn-dar-ē)
1. Second in order.
2. Caused by another condition (e.g., a secondary infection caused by antibiotic treatment for a primary infection).

secondary

A disease or disorder that results from and follows another disease or a prior episode of the same disease. Secondary cancer is the occurrence of a METASTASIS at a site remote from that of the primary tumour. Since the tumour originated in a different tissue it may differ in character from a primary growth at the new site.

sec·on·dary

(sek'ŏn-dar-ē)
1. Second in order.
2. Caused by another condition (e.g., a secondary infection caused by antibiotic treatment for a primary infection).

secondary,

adj 1. not primary, immediately following the first position; supplemental.
2. directly emerging or resulting from an original source or condition.
secondary bone,
n a second layer of bone tissue that supersedes the original bone as part of the maturation process.
secondary cancer,
n an opportunistic neoplasm imposed on a host with reduced health and resistance resulting from a preceding primary neoplasm or viral infection.
secondary deficiency,
n an inadequacy of nutrients in the diet that is the result of the body's inability effectively to process and use the foods ingested, however healthy those foods might be; may be caused by disease, allergies, or interactions between drugs and nutrients or between two nutrients.
secondary dental caries,
secondary dentition,
secondary hemorrhage,
n bleeding that develops 24 hours or more after the original injury or surgery. It is often caused by an infection.
secondary infectious disease,
n an opportunistic infection imposed on a host with reduced health and resistance resulting from a preceding infection by a more virulent organism.
secondary prevention,
n an action performed to take care of early symptoms of a disease and preclude the development of possible irreparable medical conditions. See also primary health care and primary prevention.
secondary radiation,
secondary sex characteristic,
n an external physical characteristic of sexual maturity that distinguishes one gender from the other, such as the distribution of hair and voice changes.

secondary

derived from another condition, the primary condition.

secondary attack rate
number of cases in the outbreak divided by the total number of susceptible animals in the population.
secondary carcinogens
relatively inert substances that are converted by a host-mediated reaction to an active carcinogen, e.g. nitrosamines, pyrrolizidine alkaloids.
secondary health care
the level of care in the health care system that consists of emergency treatment and critical care. Called also acute care.
secondary hypertrophic osteopathy
see hypertrophic osteopathy.
secondary immune response
see anamnestic response.
secondary pregnancy toxemia
pregnancy toxemia secondary to another condition which reduces the ewe's or cow's feed intake.
secondary radiation
see scatter radiation, compton effect.
secondary ruminal contraction
occurs after the primary ruminal cycles during feeding and terminate with eructation. See also reticuloruminal contractions.
secondary spongiosa
see secondary spongiosa.
References in periodicals archive ?
Higher secondary attack rates among family and household members of case-patients demonstrate the need for larger analyses to assess the effect of the relationship between a contact and source case-patient on disease transmission risk.
Secondary attack rates for susceptible household contacts of index case-patients with pandemic (H1N1) 2009, Victoria, Australia, May 18-June 3, 2009 * Total no.
Ill household members were not included in the calculation of the secondary attack rate if they had the same symptom onset as the index case or if symptom onset was not known.
This study reports household secondary attack rates and serial time intervals between illness onset in the index case-patient to illness onset in a household contact.
Secondary attack rates were highest in children <5 years of age and were higher in children 5-18 years of age than in adults 19-49 and [greater than or equal to] 50 years of age (Table 2).
Since outbreak and surveillance investigations typically focus on highly transmissible agents with more severe illnesses, the somewhat lower secondary attack rate observed in this study of unidentified, mixed agents is not surprising.
In these outbreak settings, secondary attack rates were 4%-20%, depending on pathogen, mode of transmission, and length of time spent in the household.
Secondary attack rates were estimated crudely and also modeled by using the life-table method.
The 1996-97 crude secondary attack rate of about 8% in households cannot be compared with the 3.
Secondary attack rates within households were calculated by dividing the number of cases that occurred 7 to 21 days following one or more index cases in a household (first-generation secondary cases) by the total number of household members, excluding index cases.