secondary amenorrhea


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Related to secondary amenorrhea: Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

sec·on·dar·y a·men·or·rhe·a

amenorrhea in which the menses appeared at puberty but subsequently ceased.

secondary amenorrhea

secondary amenorrhea

Gynecology A condition in which menstruation begins at the appropriate age but stops for 6+ months without usual causes–eg, pregnancy, lactation or menopause Etiology Excessive exercise, body fat content < 15%, extreme obesity, emotional stress, busulfan, chlorambucil, cyclophosphamide, phenothiazines, oral and other contraceptives–eg, Norplant, Depo-Provera, D&C. See Amenorrhea.

sec·on·dar·y a·men·or·rhe·a

(sek'ŏn-dar-ē ā-men'ŏr-ē'ă)
Amenorrhea in which the menses appeared at puberty but subsequently ceased.
References in periodicals archive ?
Similarly to PCOS and CAH, Cushing syndrome can be an underlying cause of secondary amenorrhea and will present as hyperandrogenic hypogonadism.
With regard to the impact of amenorrhoea at individual and societal levels it has been shown that patients with untreated secondary amenorrhea are at higher risk in developing major depressive and/or anxiety disorder [4].
The company's SPRY Trial is a randomized, placebo-controlled phase 3 clinical trial designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of TX 12-002-HR for secondary amenorrhea, a condition treated to maintain fertility in young premenopausal women.
Secondly, secondary amenorrhea occurs in females with a cessation of menstruation for >90 days that once menstruated.
Secondary amenorrhea is diagnosed if you've had regular periods, but they suddenly stop for more than three to six months.
Patients may clinically present with primary or secondary amenorrhea.
9% versus 0%), as well as secondary amenorrhea (absence of a cycle over 90 days after the onset of menses; 41.
When evaluating a woman with secondary amenorrhea, a positive family history may inform the differential diagnosis.
The athlete presented with secondary amenorrhea (0-3 menstrual cycles per year) for 6 years between the ages of 18 and 25 years, then became oligoamenorrheic (4-9 cycles per year) aged 25-26 years.
Exogenous progestogen administration often is used to treat secondary amenorrhea, manage luteal phase deficiency, prevent endometrial hyperplasia, ameliorate dysfunctional uterine bleeding, and treat endometriosis.
The condition is present in approximately a third of women with secondary amenorrhea and three-fourths of women with anovulatory infertility, Dr.