secondary

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secondary

/sec·on·dary/ (sek´un-dar″e) second or inferior in order of time, place, or importance; derived from or consequent to a primary event or thing.

secondary

(sĕk′ən-dĕr′ē)
adj.
1. Second or lower in rank or importance; not primary: concerns that are secondary.
2. Of, relating to, or being the shorter flight feathers projecting along the inner edge of a bird's wing.
3. Being a degree of health care intermediate between primary care and tertiary care, as that typically offered at a community hospital.
n. pl. secondar·ies
1. One that acts in an auxiliary, subordinate, or inferior capacity.
2. One of the shorter flight feathers projecting along the inner edge of a bird's wing.

sec′ond·ar′i·ly (-dâr′ə-lē) adv.
sec′ond·ar′i·ness n.

secondary

[sek′ənder′ē]
Etymology: L, secundus, second
second in importance or in occurrence or belonging to the second order of sophistication or development, such as a secondary health care facility or secondary education.

secondary

adjective
(1) Not primary; generally referring to that which follows another linked process.
(2) Metastatic, see there.
 
noun A metastatic focus of tumour.

secondary

adjective 
1. Not primary; generally that which follows another linked process.
2. Metastatic, see there.

sec·on·dar·y

(sek'ŏn-dar-ē)
1. Second in order.
2. Caused by another condition (e.g., a secondary infection caused by antibiotic treatment for a primary infection).

secondary

A disease or disorder that results from and follows another disease or a prior episode of the same disease. Secondary cancer is the occurrence of a METASTASIS at a site remote from that of the primary tumour. Since the tumour originated in a different tissue it may differ in character from a primary growth at the new site.

sec·on·dary

(sek'ŏn-dar-ē)
1. Second in order.
2. Caused by another condition (e.g., a secondary infection caused by antibiotic treatment for a primary infection).

secondary,

adj 1. not primary, immediately following the first position; supplemental.
2. directly emerging or resulting from an original source or condition.
secondary bone,
n a second layer of bone tissue that supersedes the original bone as part of the maturation process.
secondary cancer,
n an opportunistic neoplasm imposed on a host with reduced health and resistance resulting from a preceding primary neoplasm or viral infection.
secondary deficiency,
n an inadequacy of nutrients in the diet that is the result of the body's inability effectively to process and use the foods ingested, however healthy those foods might be; may be caused by disease, allergies, or interactions between drugs and nutrients or between two nutrients.
secondary dental caries,
secondary dentition,
secondary hemorrhage,
n bleeding that develops 24 hours or more after the original injury or surgery. It is often caused by an infection.
secondary infectious disease,
n an opportunistic infection imposed on a host with reduced health and resistance resulting from a preceding infection by a more virulent organism.
secondary prevention,
n an action performed to take care of early symptoms of a disease and preclude the development of possible irreparable medical conditions. See also primary health care and primary prevention.
secondary radiation,
secondary sex characteristic,
n an external physical characteristic of sexual maturity that distinguishes one gender from the other, such as the distribution of hair and voice changes.

secondary

derived from another condition, the primary condition.

secondary attack rate
number of cases in the outbreak divided by the total number of susceptible animals in the population.
secondary carcinogens
relatively inert substances that are converted by a host-mediated reaction to an active carcinogen, e.g. nitrosamines, pyrrolizidine alkaloids.
secondary health care
the level of care in the health care system that consists of emergency treatment and critical care. Called also acute care.
secondary hypertrophic osteopathy
see hypertrophic osteopathy.
secondary immune response
see anamnestic response.
secondary pregnancy toxemia
pregnancy toxemia secondary to another condition which reduces the ewe's or cow's feed intake.
secondary radiation
see scatter radiation, compton effect.
secondary ruminal contraction
occurs after the primary ruminal cycles during feeding and terminate with eructation. See also reticuloruminal contractions.
secondary spongiosa
see secondary spongiosa.
References in periodicals archive ?
This comes through especially in Virgil's sense of belatedness and secondariness with respect to all that comes after the Homeric age.
Leslie Brisman has examined the extent to which Darley created a "myth of weakness," explicating his own secondariness.
Ev en Irigaray's notion of mimicry is brought to new Hegelian heights in a reading of Ayn Rand's novel The Fountainhead, where the secondariness of ultra-macho figures elevates itself into the spirit of a "feminine subject liberated from the deadlocks of hysteria" (108).
The secondariness of femininity in Rossetti's ostensibly heteroerotic "Dreamland" becomes even more apparent in "The Stream's Secret"--a longer poem, dating from 1859, that Riede understandably finds "somewhat obscure and tortuous" (Rossetti Revisited, p.
According to Said, by linking the world, the text, and the critic to each other we bring them out of the neglect and secondariness to which, for all kinds of political and ideological reasons, they had previously been condemned.