second-line


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

second-line

(sĕk′ənd-lĭn′)
adj.
1. Relating to or being a secondary stage of something: the body's second-line defense against infection.
2. Being a drug or therapy that is used to treat a condition or disease only after another drug or therapy has been used or considered.
References in periodicals archive ?
It showed that of the 22,956 individuals given second-line treatment, only 8.
Health care company Bayer reported on Thursday the receipt of approval from the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Stivarga (regorafenib) tablets for the second-line treatment of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of liver cancer.
The most reliable way to rule out resistance to second-line drugs is a newly recommended diagnostic test for use in national TB reference laboratories.
Patients eligible for our analysis received second-line therapies according to physician discretion and were treated until progression, toxicity, physician discretion or death.
North American and European ART guidelines recommend that genotyping governs decisions on the appropriate treatment for patients failing second-line ART.
tuberculosis isolates were cultured and examined by first- and second-line anti-TB drug susceptibility test (DST) at the SPCH TB reference laboratory.
They found that adding beta-blockers as the second-line drug, in combination with thiazide diuretics or calcium channel blockers, caused an additional blood pressure reduction.
Matrix' antiretroviral products include active pharmaceutical ingredients and first- and second-line finished doses.
In a report published on March 24, 2006, MMWR reported that CDC, in collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO) and participating supranational reference laboratories, had agreed to define extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR TB) as cases of TB disease in persons whose Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates were resistant to isoniazid and rifampin and at least three of the six main classes of second-line drugs (aminoglycosides, polypeptides, fluoroquinolones, thioamides, cycloserine, and para-aminosalicyclic acid) (1).
The drugs covered in the agreements are the more expensive second-line treatments (the drugs needed when the initial treatments are no longer effective).
For patients who then fail first-line chemotherapy, there are currently no approved second-line chemotherapy regimens.
Because most women with advanced stage ovarian cancer respond well to the first chemotherapy, but ultimately recur, many have suggested that we should consolidate on the initial gains of treatment by adding second-line chemotherapy just as soon as the first-line therapy ends.