second-generation antipsychotic


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second-generation antipsychotic

An antipsychotic drug that causes increased appetite, weight gain, and adverse effects on lipids. They differ from first-generation antipsychotics in that they are less likely to cause extrapyramidal side effects or tardive dyskinesia.
Synonym: atypical antipsychotic
See also: antipsychotic
References in periodicals archive ?
A meta-analysis of head-to-head comparisons of second-generation antipsychotics in the treatment of schizophrenia.
Use of a second-generation antipsychotic drug was associated with a 3.
Appendix AS3: Predictive Margins of Second-Generation Antipsychotic use among Continuously ([greater than or equal to] 10 Months/Year), Noncontinuously (<10 Months/ Year), and All (1-12 Months/Year) Medicaid-Enrolled U.
The second-generation antipsychotic agents are not free of burdensome side effects, however.
The data showed that EVP-6124 had a clinically meaningful and statistically significant impact on patients' overall cognition - the trial's pre-specified primary endpoint - when taken in combination with second-generation antipsychotics and as measured by the full CogState overall cognitive index, or "OCI" (p=0.
Risperdal Consta was the first long-acting injectable second-generation antipsychotic to be licensed for the maintenance treatment of schizophrenia in patients currently stabilised with oral antipsychotics.
Villarreal said his personal practice is to reserve the second-generation antipsychotic agents for the most severe cases, including those involving psychosis or severe dissociation, because of the significant metabolic and other side effects accompanying use of these drugs.
1) It has been suggested that clozapine should be positioned as a second-line treatment for first-episode schizophrenics who fail one trial of a second-generation antipsychotic.
While the proportional use of second-generation antipsychotic drugs was found to rise from 13 to 64 per cent during follow-up, the gap in life expectancy from age 20 years between patients with schizophrenia and the general population did not widen between 1996 and 2006.
In October 1997, Medi-Cal granted open access to three second-generation antipsychotic medications: risperidone, olanzapine, and quetiapine.
Second-generation antipsychotic drugs: mechanistically distinct or minor variants?