seclusion


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seclusion

 [sĕ-kloo´zhun]
in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as solitary containment in a fully protective environment with close surveillance by nursing staff for purposes of safety or behavior management.

seclusion1

[siklo̅o̅′zhən]
Etymology: L, secludere, to isolate
(in psychiatry) the isolation of a patient in a special room to decrease stimuli that might be causing or exacerbating the patient's emotional distress. The room is free from objects that the patient might use to cause self-harm or to harm others.

seclusion2

a nursing intervention from the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) defined as solitary containment in a fully protective environment with close surveillance by nursing staff for purposes of safety or behavior management. See also Nursing Interventions Classification.

seclusion

A strategy for managing disturbed and violent patients in psychiatric units in the UK, which consists of supervised confinement of the patient to a separate room (i.e., involuntary isolation) to protect him- or herself and others from harm.

seclusion

Forensic psychiatry A strategy for managing disturbed and violent Pts in psychiatric units, which consists of supervised confinement of a Pt to a room–ie, involuntary isolation, to protect others from harm
References in classic literature ?
Let us pardon her one other pause; for it is given to the sole sentiment, or, we might better say, --heightened and rendered intense, as it has been, by sorrow and seclusion,--to the strong passion of her life.
He, and his old canvas frock, and his loose stockings, and all his poor tatters of clothes, had, in a long seclusion from direct light and air, faded down to such a dull uniformity of parchment-yellow, that it would have been hard to say which was which.
It is very bold in me,' said Agnes, looking up again, 'who have lived in such seclusion, and can know so little of the world, to give you my advice so confidently, or even to have this strong opinion.
I had heard of Miss Havisham up town - everybody for miles round, had heard of Miss Havisham up town - as an immensely rich and grim lady who lived in a large and dismal house barricaded against robbers, and who led a life of seclusion.
The tender and peculiar love with which Silas had reared her in almost inseparable companionship with himself, aided by the seclusion of their dwelling, had preserved her from the lowering influences of the village talk and habits, and had kept her mind in that freshness which is sometimes falsely supposed to be an invariable attribute of rusticity.
The prime minister, who was the only person admitted, felt it his duty at last to tell the king how much the court and all the people complained of his seclusion, and how bad it was for the nation.
I have always lived in seclusion, and for the last two years I have wished for nothing better.
But now in this hateful age of ours not one is safe, not though some new labyrinth like that of Crete conceal and surround her; even there the pestilence of gallantry will make its way to them through chinks or on the air by the zeal of its accursed importunity, and, despite of all seclusion, lead them to ruin.
I was then in Germany, attracted thither by the wars in that country, which have not yet been brought to a termination; and as I was returning to the army from the coronation of the emperor, the setting in of winter arrested me in a locality where, as I found no society to interest me, and was besides fortunately undisturbed by any cares or passions, I remained the whole day in seclusion, with full opportunity to occupy my attention with my own thoughts.
He came out of his seclusion, renewed relations with his friends, became once more their familiar guest and entertainer; and whilst he had always been known for charities, he was now no less distinguished for religion.
It is possible, Haidee, that so perfect a seclusion, though conformable with the habits and customs of the East, may not be practicable in Paris.
During the five years of this seclusion, which would have improved and matured the intellect of any other man, M.