searching

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searching

 [serch´ing]
probing or investigating.
free text searching a search mode in which titles, abstracts, full texts, or other natural language fields of bibliographic or source databases are searched for one or more words, whose proximity to each other may be specified in order to increase the specificity of the search.
References in classic literature ?
She held me by both hands, and her eyes fastened searchingly on mine.
Then ranging them before him near the capstan, with their harpoons in their hands, while his three mates stood at his side with their lances, and the rest of the ship's company formed a circle round the group; he stood for an instant searchingly eyeing every man of his crew.
Please turn that cardboard face down, and take this one, and compare it searchingly, by the magnifier, with the fatal signature upon the knife handle, and report your finding to the court.
Korak looked searchingly down upon her, mentally anathematizing the broad-brimmed hat that hid her features from his eyes.
And Britain's friends everywhere are currently looking at it, quizzically and rather searchingly, as it negotiates Brexit to assess whether we are shrinking back from them as well.
Lloyd selected a searchingly slow tempo for Butterworth's poignant A Shropshire Lad (an appropriate offering on this Remembrance Weekend), one which in some departments exposed the scant rehearsal allocation, but one which also announced to us that splendid pairing of clarinets.
Theroux" who looks searchingly at him, but whose efforts,
She and Bailey were earnestly, bravely, searchingly hashing it out, with young Alyson eagerly listening in.
Recognizing this ambiguity, this Part offers one reading of Shelby County--namely, that the Court searchingly reviewed the VRA because it differentiated between the states in a way that impinged on the covered states' dignity.
Where are the individuals now, whose blank faces stare searchingly out at us?
But it is the second of the problems Peltason describes, the problem of a lack of employment, that Austen explores most searchingly in Emma, the more deeply frightening form of "enveloping ennui," which, at the beginning of the novel, Emma does not feel: "The danger .
Rather, it is to suggest only that asylum officers are positioned to accept and apply state law and assumptions rather than daily to inquire searchingly into them.