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Related to searches: Searches and seizures

search

 [serch]
1. to probe or investigate.
2. a probe or investigation.
literature search a search intended to create a customized bibliography that treats aspects of a research, scholarly, or topical literature of interest.
References in periodicals archive ?
Selected findings, summarized below, provide interesting insights into current patterns of public Web searching, including how people structure their Web searches, what they search for, and search behavior in special topic areas.
The court noted that the defendant's probation officer was authorized to conduct warrantless searches and the probation order stated that the probationer "shall consent" to such searches.
The program saves a limited number of previous searches automatically.
Before examining the Supreme Court's view of searches of probationers and parolees, a brief review of Fourth Amendment law is appropriate.
These features (also referred to as advanced search techniques) allow you to refine and control your searches to retrieve information that more closely matches your needs.
This consolidation process actually searches the database for candidate matches as each record is loaded, and then, for members of this candidate match set, performs a very complex field-by-field comparison and weighting to decide whether to consolidate the incoming record with one of the records in the candidate pool; in cases where consolidation occurs, individual contributor site cataloging variations are recorded and maintained on a field by field basis.
One important rule is that the laws of probability apply searches (i.
AOL today announced the year's top searches based on topics in specific categories that received the highest volume of online queries on AOL Search (http://search.
The Fourth Amendment preserves the "right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures.
For instance, most CD-ROM searches for a Code section yield not just that section, but easily accessible cross-reference links to, for example, the related regulations, definitions of certain words in a tax glossary, the corresponding portions of a multivolume tax service in which the section is discussed, or other Code sections cited within the searched section.
The scope of warrantless searches based on probable cause is no narrower - and no broader - than the scope of a search authorized by a warrant supported by probable cause.