scurvy grass


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scurvy grass

n.
1. Any of various plants of the genus Cochlearia of the mustard family, especially the circumboreal species C. officinalis, having pungent fleshy foliage and formerly used to prevent or treat scurvy.
2. Any of various other plants formerly used to prevent or treat scurvy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Perhaps we're all too busy rushing from hither to thither as each day crashes headlong into the next to take time out to savour the little things, even if it's just some lichen on a kerb stone or Danish Scurvy Grass on the hard shoulder.
Most know the story of Danish scurvy grass colonising the country -the maritime plants are able to survive far inland because of the salt put on roads in icy conditions in winter, and seeds are often transferred long distances on the wheels of lorries and cars.
Danish scurvy grass is in flower in the area now, benefitting from the salt placed on the roads in winter, especially on Liverpool Road into Prescot town centre and on St Helens Road.
Jim Brady reports Danish Scurvy Grass in bud this week and flowering oriental blackcurrant in St Helens last week.
The narrow salt marsh fringing the muddy Humber is made up of those salt loving perennials, cord grass, sea plantain, scurvy grass and sea aster, and the entire tangled mass of bleached vegetation is the winter home of wren and snipe.
The track down to the beach is bounded by rough grass banks that in places are a riot of colour as sunshine shades of celandine (finished where we live but thriving in the warmer climate)and primrose compete with violet and the stark white of scurvy grass.
Danish Scurvy Grass and Reflexed Saltmarsh-grass have begun to migrate inland and other once alien plants, such as Pearly Everlasting and New Zealand Pigmyweed, have become more common across Wales.
For example, the seaside plant, Danish Scurvy Grass, is now found in the middle of the country.
A variety of typical dune flora can still be found here, even though most of the sand dunes as such have gone: sea rocket, buckshorn plantain, storksbill, restharrow, kidney vetch, scurvy grass, centaury, hare's foot clover and evening primose all conspicuous.