scrotal cancer

scrotal cancer

an epidermoid malignancy of the scrotum, characterized initially by a small sore that may ulcerate. The lesion occurs most frequently in elderly men who have been exposed to soot, pitch, crude oil, mineral oils, polycyclic hydrocarbons, or arsenic fumes from copper smelting. Treatment involves wide surgical excision of the tumor and resection of inguinal nodes. In the eighteenth century Sir Percival Pott associated scrotal cancer in chimney sweeps with exposure to soot. It was the first malignancy shown to be caused by an environmental carcinogen. Also called chimney-sweeps' cancer, soot wart.
References in periodicals archive ?
Weinberg begins the story of how tumors occur from the first cell with the story of Percival Pott who studied scrotal cancer in chimney sweeps in England in 1775.
One scrotal cancer is recorded at a mind-boggling seven feet in circumference and two feet round its neck.
The ability of certain PAH compounds and PAH mixtures to induce cancers has been the subject of research since the original observation by Pott of increased scrotal cancer incidence among chimney sweeps in 1775, and the first induction of skin tumours in rabbits by dermal application of coal tar for 150 days.
For example, in the 18th century, Sir Percival Pott stopped an epidemic of scrotal cancer in chimney sweeps by asking them to improve their genital hygiene (Pott 1775), while knowing little about the cause, biology or mechanism of this disease.
Early reports identified elevated scrotal cancer in chimney sweeps (Pott 1775), lung cancer in uranium miners (Harting and Hesse 1879), and urinary bladder cancers in dye industry workers (Rehn 1895).
In 1775, Sir Percival Pott described a high frequency of scrotal cancer among chimney sweeps exposed to coal tar, establishing one of the first links between occupational exposure and cancer.
A mortality analysis of workers in many occupations indicated an increased risk of scrotal cancer for creosote-exposed brickmakers (18,34-38).
They are also a recognised cause of occupational skin and scrotal cancers.
Settlements have been made in the past for former Rover workers who suffered scrotal cancers believed to have been caused by carcinogenic oils used in heavy manufacturing until the 1970s.
While in an advice centre he found leaflets linking the oils with skin and scrotal cancers.
In 18th century England, the high incidence of scrotal cancers noted among chimney sweeps led the enactment of protective regulations requiring these workers to bathe.
Sir Percival Potts observed an apparent association between scrotal cancers and tar and soot exposures among chimney sweeps in London in 1775 (Harrison 2004).