scrofula


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

lymphadenitis

 [lim″fad-ĕ-ni´tis]
inflammation of one or more lymph nodes, usually caused by a primary focus of infection elsewhere in the body.
cervical lymphadenitis cervical adenitis.
cervical lymphadenitis, tuberculous tuberculosis of the cervical lymph nodes, formerly called scrofula. Called also tuberculous cervical adenitis.
tuberculous lymphadenitis tuberculosis of lymph nodes, usually either cervical (tuberculous cervical lymphadenitis) or mediastinal. See also scrofuloderma.

scrof·u·la

(skrof'yū-lă),
Historic term for cervical tuberculous lymphadenitis.
[L. scrofulae (pl. only), a glandular swelling, scrofula, fr. scrofa, a breeding sow]

scrofula

/scrof·u·la/ (skrof´u-lah) old name for tuberculous cervical lymphadenitis.

scrofula

(skrŏf′yə-lə)
n.
A form of tuberculosis affecting the lymph nodes, especially of the neck, that is most common in children and is usually spread by unpasteurized milk from infected cows. Also called struma.

scrofula

[skrof′yələ]
Etymology: L, scrofa, brood sow
archaic. a form of tuberculosis cutis with abscess formation, usually of the cervical lymph nodes.
enlarge picture
Scrofula
Medical history Infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the ‘robber of youth’
Substance abuse A popular term for the epidemic of cocaine abuse

scrofula

Bovine TUBERCULOSIS of the lymph nodes of the neck, with or without breakdown of the skin. Milk pasteurization and herd control have reduced this once common condition to a negligible incidence in developed countries.

scrofula (skrof´ūlə),

n. a primary tuberculosis complex occurring in the orocervical region and consisting of tuberculous cervical lymphadenopathy and tuberculosis of adjacent skin (lupus vulgaris), with chronic draining sinuses below the angle of the jaw and cervical region.
References in periodicals archive ?
Scrofula was seldom fatal and given to spontaneous cure or remission, but in old times belief in its power was strong and King Henry IV of France is reported to have touched and healed as many as 1,500 individuals at one time.
The neighbor approached Alice with the concoction when one of Alice's daughters lay dying from scrofula, a tuberculosis-related disease, having been pronounced hopeless by attending physicians and left to die.
One lady was here who had scrofula in the hand so bad that she had a hole through the palm of the hand; after staying here for a few weeks, she returned to her home, her hand cured.
ONCE upon a time people believed that the monarch's touch would instantly cure their string-warts and scrofula while banishing bad breath and footrot.
Although earlier monarchs often used the "royal touch" for scrofula, it might be wondered how many of their subjects with what we would now call "psychosomatic ailments" might have benefited from that laying on of hands.
The whole herb was used medicinally in the form of a decoction with cumin and milk in fever, nervous debility, loss of memory, syphilis and scrofula.
Yaoxian, who is suffering from scrofula and a conjunctiva meningitis, was said to be critically ill, reports the China Daily.
Entries include "difficult birth," "infant scrofula," "poor eyesight," "bronchitis," "breathing troubles," "bowel problems," "facial pain," "rheumatism," "gout," "dropsy," stroke," and "testicular tumour.
What was the tradition associated with the condition scrofula, or king's evil?
The picturesque village of Ballater first became a tourist hot spot during the 19th century when the local waters were discovered to help cure scrofula, a form of TB.
Hortense made no secret of her dislike for Germaine, who was born with a deformed right hand and had the disease of scrofula, which made sores erupt on her neck.
The Anglican kings and queens of England helped maintain their popularity by using "The King's Touch" to cure scrofula, a disease of the neck now treated with penicillin.