scrofula


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lymphadenitis

 [lim″fad-ĕ-ni´tis]
inflammation of one or more lymph nodes, usually caused by a primary focus of infection elsewhere in the body.
cervical lymphadenitis cervical adenitis.
cervical lymphadenitis, tuberculous tuberculosis of the cervical lymph nodes, formerly called scrofula. Called also tuberculous cervical adenitis.
tuberculous lymphadenitis tuberculosis of lymph nodes, usually either cervical (tuberculous cervical lymphadenitis) or mediastinal. See also scrofuloderma.

scrof·u·la

(skrof'yū-lă),
Historic term for cervical tuberculous lymphadenitis.
[L. scrofulae (pl. only), a glandular swelling, scrofula, fr. scrofa, a breeding sow]

scrofula

/scrof·u·la/ (skrof´u-lah) old name for tuberculous cervical lymphadenitis.

scrofula

(skrŏf′yə-lə)
n.
A form of tuberculosis affecting the lymph nodes, especially of the neck, that is most common in children and is usually spread by unpasteurized milk from infected cows. Also called struma.

scrofula

[skrof′yələ]
Etymology: L, scrofa, brood sow
archaic. a form of tuberculosis cutis with abscess formation, usually of the cervical lymph nodes.
enlarge picture
Scrofula
Medical history Infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the ‘robber of youth’
Substance abuse A popular term for the epidemic of cocaine abuse

scrofula

Bovine TUBERCULOSIS of the lymph nodes of the neck, with or without breakdown of the skin. Milk pasteurization and herd control have reduced this once common condition to a negligible incidence in developed countries.

scrofula (skrof´ūlə),

n. a primary tuberculosis complex occurring in the orocervical region and consisting of tuberculous cervical lymphadenopathy and tuberculosis of adjacent skin (lupus vulgaris), with chronic draining sinuses below the angle of the jaw and cervical region.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1595, Francois de la Ramee, the False Francois de Valois, demonstrated an ability to cure scrofula as "proof" of his royal identity.
The picturesque village of Ballater first became a tourist hot spot during the 19th century when the local waters were discovered to help cure scrofula, a form of TB.
Hortense made no secret of her dislike for Germaine, who was born with a deformed right hand and had the disease of scrofula, which made sores erupt on her neck.
Researches on Scrofula with reference to the propagation of disease by inheritance and intermarriage.
The Anglican kings and queens of England helped maintain their popularity by using "The King's Touch" to cure scrofula, a disease of the neck now treated with penicillin.
In "Healing Angels and 'golden blood': Money and Mystical Kingship in Macbeth," Stephen Deng discusses how monarchs from Edward the Confessor to James I used golden angels to cure scrofula.
Struck by scrofula shortly after his birth in 1709, he lost much of his eyesight and went through life half-blind, having to read by pressing his face to the page.
In addition, Johnson was slightly deaf, practically blind in one eye--a result of the scrofula he suffered as a child--and extremely nearsighted in the other.
my race that no ablution of hyssop mixed with lilies could purify my race pitted with blemishes my race a ripe grape for drunken feet my queen of spittle and leprosy my queen of whips and scrofula my queen of squasma and chloasma (oh those queens I once loved in the remote gardens of spring against the illumination of all the candles of those chestnut trees
The monarch's touchwas said to cure a skin disease called scrofula.
Thus "English kings were thought to heal scrofula by touch" with Charles the Second touching "nearly one hundred thousand sufferers from scrofula during his reign" (Noel 75).