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scribe

(skrīb),
1. To write, trace, or mark by making a line with a marker or pointed instrument, as in surveying a dental cast for a removable prosthesis.
2. To form, by instrumentation, negative areas within a master cast to provide a positive beading in the framework of a removable partial denture, or the posterior palatal seal area for a complete denture.
[L. scribo, pp. scripto, to write]

scribe

(skrīb)
1. To write, trace, or mark by making a line with a marker or pointed instrument, as in surveying a dental cast for a removable prosthesis.
2. To form, by instrumentation, negative areas within a master cast to provide a positive beading in framework of a removable partial denture, or posterior palatal seal area for a complete denture.
[L. scribo, pp. scripto, to write]

scribe,

v to write, trace, or mark by making a line or lines with a pointed instrument or carbon marker.
References in periodicals archive ?
In recording such practical information along with the more literary contents of his book, Hanson reflected a stage not only in the transition from an oral to a scribal culture, but also in the formation of a burgeoning "public" for painting (especially portraiture and wall painting), and for the associated genres of heraldry and calligraphy.
xxv) Author: John Suckling (amateur) Includes dramatis personae list Manuscript type: scribal presentation copy (1637-8) Play type: professional (King's Men) Source: Greg 1931, 332-3
Indeed, her treatment of formularies in the contexts of literacy, orality, and scribal activity makes the book methodologically useful for anyone concerned with the production and reception of texts before printing.
This passage highlights the logic of a scribal poetics.
The colophon is another aspect of the codex that clearly stands in a scribal tradition inherited from India.
But was Eisenstein really so blind to the points the present writers are malting about the limitations of print and the continuity of scribal and oral promulgation of texts in the period?
Over half of the manuscripts are thought to be written in the poets' own handwriting (Astell, Burghope, Palmer, Roper, Seager, Ley [partial], Walsh, and Wroth), and the remaining six are in scribal hands (Cavendish, Hutchinson, Philips, Pulter, Southwell, and Sidney).
Most impressively, the volumes show the connectivity between oral and scribal forms of the literatures of this pan-African world.
probable scribal omissions as well as damaged or lost text that is impossible to restore" (9), is confusing.
Ong documents the shift from the largely oral/aural modes of communication, consciousness, and culture associated with scribal culture, and towards an increasingly more dominant visualism.
When a judge's discretion is infringed upon, it makes it difficult to do that because with new laws, there's a lot of scribal errors,'' she said.
Doyle confirms the same scribal hand in The Prick of Conscience and the B text of Piers Plowman.