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screen

 [skrēn]
1. a framework or agent used as a shield or protector; called also protectant and protective.
2. to separate well individuals in a population from those who have an undiagnosed disease, defect, or other pathologic condition or who are at high risk by means of tests, examinations, or other procedures. See also screening.
Bjerrum screen tangent screen.
fluoroscopic screen a phosphorescent screen that shows the movement and relationship of organs and structures in fluoroscopy.
intensifying screen a fluorescent screen used in conjunction with x-ray film to enhance the effect of the radiation and reduce dosage to the patient. The screen must be matched to the emissivity range; the emissivity of phosphorus is similar to that of the human eye, so that phosphors absorb x-ray energy and convert it to visible light.
tangent screen a large square of black cloth with a central mark for fixation; used with a campimeter in mapping the field of vision.

screen

(skrēn),
1. A sheet of any substance used to shield an object from any influence, such as heat, light, or x-rays.
See also: screen memory.
2. A sheet on which an image is projected.
See also: screen memory.
3. Formerly, to make a fluoroscopic examination.
See also: screen memory.
4. In psychoanalysis, concealment, as one image or memory concealing another.
See also: screen memory.
5. To examine, evaluate; to process a group to select or separate certain individuals from it.
6. A thin layer of crystals that converts x-rays to light photons to expose film; used in a cassette to produce radiographic images on film.
[Fr. écran]

screen

(skrēn)
1. a structure resembling a curtain or partition, used as a protection or shield, e.g., against excessive radiation exposure.
2. a large flat surface upon which light rays are projected.
3. protective (2).
4. to examine by fluoroscopy (Great Britain).
5. to separate well individuals in a population from those with an undiagnosed pathologic condition by means of tests, examinations, or other procedures.

skin screen  a substance applied to the skin to protect it from the sun's rays or other noxious agents.
solar screen , sun screen sunscreen.

screen

(skrēn)
n.
1. A movable device that serves to protect, conceal, or divide.
2. A surface or device on which an image is displayed for viewing.
3. A screen memory.
v.
1. To process a group of people in order to select or separate certain individuals from it.
2. To test or examine for the presence of disease or infection.
3. To subject to genetic screening.

screen

Molecular biology
verb To detect a phenotype’s presence or absence by testing for growth under different conditions (e.g., plus and minus an auxotrophic supplement or permissive and non-permissive conditions), usually done by replica plating or patching colonies onto each type of plate.
 
Public health
noun
(1) Any systematic activity—e.g., measuring BP, glucose or cholesterol; pap smear; or other activity—which attempts to identify a particular disease in persons in a particular population.
(2) A popular term for a solar protection barrier.

screen

Public health
1. Any systematic activity–eg, measuring BP, glucose or cholesterol, pap smear, or other activity, which attempts to identify a particular disease in persons in a particular population. See Drug screen, General health screen, Laxative screen, Memory Impairment screen, Metabolic screen, Neonatal screen.
2. A solar protection barrier. See Sunscreen.

screen

(skrēn)
1. A sheet of any substance used to shield an object from any influence (e.g., heat, light, x-rays).
2. A sheet on which an image is projected.
3. psychoanalysis Concealment, as one image or memory concealing another.
See also: screen memory
4. To examine, evaluate; to process a group to select or separate certain individuals from it.
5. A thin layer of crystals that converts x-rays to light photons to expose film; used in a cassette to produce radiographic images on film.
6. To examine for the presence or absence of specified characteristics to determine whether further examination is needed.
[Fr. écran]

screen,

n initial examination to determine the existence of a disease or disorder.

screen

(skrēn)
1. A sheet of any substance used to shield an object from any influence, such as heat, light, or x-rays.
2. A sheet on which an image is projected.
3. To examine, evaluate; to process a group to select or separate some individuals from it.
Synonym(s): screening (1).
[Fr. écran]

screen

1. a framework or agent used as a shield or protector.
2. to examine.

fast screen
permits big reduction in exposure to x-ray beam.
screen film
prepared to be used with intensifying screens. The standard film and marketed as being of standard, fast or ultrafast speeds.
rare-earth screen
see rare-earth intensifying screen.
References in classic literature ?
And so saying, she took the screens out of her sister-in-law's hands, to admire them herself as they ought to be admired.
Thus squires should be swindled in long rooms panelled with oak; while Jews, on the other hand, should rather find themselves unexpectedly penniless among the lights and screens of the Cafe Riche.
If you maintain a dead church, contribute to a dead Bible-society, vote with a great party either for the government or against it, spread your table like base housekeepers,--under all these screens I have difficulty to detect the precise man you are.
I have ordered screens, but until they come I shall expect you to see that the windows remain closed.
Three-and-sixpence has been spent in vain-- the screens retire to Miss Clapp's bedroom, who persists in thinking them lovely.
Genteel blinds and makeshifts were more or less observable as soon as their doors were opened; screens not half high enough, which made dining-rooms out of arched passages, and warded off obscure corners where footboys slept at nights with their heads among the knives and forks; curtains which called upon you to believe that they didn't hide anything; panes of glass which requested you not to see them; many objects of various forms, feigning to have no connection with their guilty secret, a bed; disguised traps in walls, which were clearly coal-cellars; affectations of no thoroughfares, which were evidently doors to little kitchens.
I don't know what gives it that simply gorgeous look, whether it's the full curtains, or that elegant screen, or Rebecca's lamp; but you certainly do have a faculty for fixing up.
Mazey nor myself desire to screen ourselves from blame, if blame we have deserved.
Dunsey was not without fear that he might meet some acquaintance in whose eyes he would cut a pitiable figure, for mist is no screen when people get close to each other; but when he at last found himself in the well-known Raveloe lanes without having met a soul, he silently remarked that that was part of his usual good luck.
Suddenly his eye fell on the screen that he had placed in front of the portrait, and he started.
A quarter of an hour later I was rushing up and down the room in frenzied impatience, from minute to minute I went up to the screen and peeped through the crack at Liza.
Nor is that surprising, seeing that the family lives in a single room, with only a screen to divide it for decency's sake.