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screen

 [skrēn]
1. a framework or agent used as a shield or protector; called also protectant and protective.
2. to separate well individuals in a population from those who have an undiagnosed disease, defect, or other pathologic condition or who are at high risk by means of tests, examinations, or other procedures. See also screening.
Bjerrum screen tangent screen.
fluoroscopic screen a phosphorescent screen that shows the movement and relationship of organs and structures in fluoroscopy.
intensifying screen a fluorescent screen used in conjunction with x-ray film to enhance the effect of the radiation and reduce dosage to the patient. The screen must be matched to the emissivity range; the emissivity of phosphorus is similar to that of the human eye, so that phosphors absorb x-ray energy and convert it to visible light.
tangent screen a large square of black cloth with a central mark for fixation; used with a campimeter in mapping the field of vision.

screen

(skrēn),
1. A sheet of any substance used to shield an object from any influence, such as heat, light, or x-rays.
See also: screen memory.
2. A sheet on which an image is projected.
See also: screen memory.
3. Formerly, to make a fluoroscopic examination.
See also: screen memory.
4. In psychoanalysis, concealment, as one image or memory concealing another.
See also: screen memory.
5. To examine, evaluate; to process a group to select or separate certain individuals from it.
6. A thin layer of crystals that converts x-rays to light photons to expose film; used in a cassette to produce radiographic images on film.
[Fr. écran]

screen

(skrēn)
1. a structure resembling a curtain or partition, used as a protection or shield, e.g., against excessive radiation exposure.
2. a large flat surface upon which light rays are projected.
3. protective (2).
4. to examine by fluoroscopy (Great Britain).
5. to separate well individuals in a population from those with an undiagnosed pathologic condition by means of tests, examinations, or other procedures.

skin screen  a substance applied to the skin to protect it from the sun's rays or other noxious agents.
solar screen , sun screen sunscreen.

screen

(skrēn)
n.
1. A movable device that serves to protect, conceal, or divide.
2. A surface or device on which an image is displayed for viewing.
3. A screen memory.
v.
1. To process a group of people in order to select or separate certain individuals from it.
2. To test or examine for the presence of disease or infection.
3. To subject to genetic screening.

screen

Molecular biology
verb To detect a phenotype’s presence or absence by testing for growth under different conditions (e.g., plus and minus an auxotrophic supplement or permissive and non-permissive conditions), usually done by replica plating or patching colonies onto each type of plate.
 
Public health
noun
(1) Any systematic activity—e.g., measuring BP, glucose or cholesterol; pap smear; or other activity—which attempts to identify a particular disease in persons in a particular population.
(2) A popular term for a solar protection barrier.

screen

Public health
1. Any systematic activity–eg, measuring BP, glucose or cholesterol, pap smear, or other activity, which attempts to identify a particular disease in persons in a particular population. See Drug screen, General health screen, Laxative screen, Memory Impairment screen, Metabolic screen, Neonatal screen.
2. A solar protection barrier. See Sunscreen.

screen

(skrēn)
1. A sheet of any substance used to shield an object from any influence (e.g., heat, light, x-rays).
2. A sheet on which an image is projected.
3. psychoanalysis Concealment, as one image or memory concealing another.
See also: screen memory
4. To examine, evaluate; to process a group to select or separate certain individuals from it.
5. A thin layer of crystals that converts x-rays to light photons to expose film; used in a cassette to produce radiographic images on film.
6. To examine for the presence or absence of specified characteristics to determine whether further examination is needed.
[Fr. écran]

screen,

n initial examination to determine the existence of a disease or disorder.

screen

(skrēn)
1. A sheet of any substance used to shield an object from any influence, such as heat, light, or x-rays.
2. A sheet on which an image is projected.
3. To examine, evaluate; to process a group to select or separate some individuals from it.
Synonym(s): screening (1).
[Fr. écran]

screen

1. a framework or agent used as a shield or protector.
2. to examine.

fast screen
permits big reduction in exposure to x-ray beam.
screen film
prepared to be used with intensifying screens. The standard film and marketed as being of standard, fast or ultrafast speeds.
rare-earth screen
see rare-earth intensifying screen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Last May AFGE released a white paper that stated, among other things, that screeners were not properly trained and that they lacked the best available equipment.
Therefore, the switch back to a private force by some airports would presumably not risk a return to the former pay scale or lead to a two-tiered compensation system, with private screeners making as little as before 9-11 and federal screeners getting top dollar.
Still, it could be said that non-MPAA signatories, like the truly independent Lions Gate and Newmarket Films, benefited the most from being able to send out home screeners for their films without the restrictions major studios and their dependents had to adhere to.
According to the report, at 14 of the 19 airports studied, screeners were paid a salary of $6 or less per hour.
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Unlike conventional screeners using band-clamp arrangements, these can be more difficult to dismantle and often require tools.
The former screener states that there are a few "delusional zealots who believe they're keeping America safe by taking your snow globe, your 2-inch pocket knife, your 4-ounce bottle of shampoo and performing invasive pat-downs on your kids.
New screeners begin training with simple challenges, and as they learn the bar is raised ever higher, until they are able to spot exotic compounds and improvised explosives, and well-concealed devices.
The special screening deck is offered the company's Vibroscreen separators ranging from 40 to 72 inches in diameter and is available as a retrofit kit for any make of circular vibratory screener, the company says.
The screener is intended for scalping, de-dusting and dewatering of contamination-sensitive materials that also meets cGMP, 3-A, USDA and FDA standards.