screen time


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screen time

The amount of time a person spends in front of a “screen”, including TV, computers and video games. Increased screen time in children is associated with narrowing of retinal arteriolar calibre, which may be a surrogate marker for future risk of cardiovascular disease. Physical activity, in contrast, is associated with a wider mean retinal arteriolar calibre.

screen time

The number of hours that a person spends each day in front of a computer, or watching movies or television, or playing video games.
See also: time
References in periodicals archive ?
The organisation recommended no more than one hour of screen time a day for kids aged between two and five as well as establishing "screen-free" zones in the home.
Recently, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) announced that it is revising its guidelines for children and screen time.
The scientists said further research was needed to confirm the effect conclusively, but advised parents worried about their children's grades to consider limiting screen time.
Our oldest son gets more screen time (he has his own smartphone), but has to put it away when he goes to bed and is not allowed to have Facebook, Snapchat or Instagram.
pediatrician at the University of Michigan Health System and research fellow in the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program, said that in their poll, they found that one-quarter of parents of kids two to five years old are allowing more than three hours of entertainment screen time each day.
Set a cut-off for screen time one hour before bedtime, to allow for time spent together and give children a better chance to fall asleep naturally.
With parents concerned about the dominance of screen time in their children's lives and growing scientific evidence that a decline in active time is bad news for the health and happiness of our children, we all need to promote nature.
Reducing total daily screen time for children, and delaying the age at which they start, could provide significant advantages for their health and wellbeing," he writes.
Children aged between three and seven should be limited to half an hour to an hour of screen time each day, he said.
He wrote: "Reducing total daily screen time for children, and delaying the age at which they start, could provide significant advantages for their health and wellbeing.
Psychologist Dr Aric Sigman insists that parents need to set rules on screen time for children, and be aware they are important role models and should therefore not spend too much time in front of a screen themselves.
Psychologist Dr Aric Sigman insists that parents need to set rules on screen time for children, and be aware that they are important role models and should therefore not spend too much time in front of a screen themselves.