screen memory


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memory

 [mem´o-re]
the mental faculty that enables one to retain and recall previously experienced sensations, impressions, information, and ideas. The ability of the brain to retain and to use knowledge gained from past experience is essential to the process of learning. Although the exact way in which the brain remembers is not completely understood, it is believed that a portion of the temporal lobe of the brain, lying in part under the temples, acts as a kind of memory center, drawing on memories stored in other parts of the brain.
impaired memory a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as inability to remember bits of information or behavioral skills.
immunologic memory the capacity of the immune system to respond more rapidly and strongly to a subsequent antigenic challenge than to the first exposure. See also memory cells and immune response.
long-term memory the aspect of memory in which knowledge is stored permanently, to be activated when cued; it is theoretically unlimited in capacity.
recent memory the ability to recall events from the immediate past.
remote memory the ability to recall events from the distant past.
screen memory a consciously tolerable memory serving to conceal or “screen” another memory that might be disturbing or emotionally painful if recalled.
short-term memory what one is conscious of at a given moment; in contrast to long-term memory it is of limited capacity (about seven items) and will be lost unless rehearsed and related to information in long-term memory.

screen mem·o·ry

in psychoanalysis, a consciously tolerable memory that unwittingly serves as a cover for another associated memory that would be emotionally painful if recalled.

screen memory

n.
A memory of something that is unconsciously used to repress recollection of an associated but distressing event.

screen memory

Etymology: ME, scren + L, memoria
a consciously tolerable memory that replaces one that is emotionally painful to recall.

screen mem·o·ry

(skrēn mem'ŏr-ē)
psychoanalysis A consciously tolerable memory that serves as a cover for another associated memory that would be emotionally painful if recalled.
References in periodicals archive ?
That is, the screen memory excludes the production of its images from the field of her consciousness and from the audience's view as well.
These sequences refer to theatricality, to the artifice inherent in performance, and explicitly to acting, to the way sound and movement on a stage or screen actualize a persona or identity, and hence to the way a screen memory gains credence through its performance in the imagination.
Other works, however, had more of a minimalist character, such as Vestige and Screen Memory #2 (both 1992).