screen


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screen

 [skrēn]
1. a framework or agent used as a shield or protector; called also protectant and protective.
2. to separate well individuals in a population from those who have an undiagnosed disease, defect, or other pathologic condition or who are at high risk by means of tests, examinations, or other procedures. See also screening.
Bjerrum screen tangent screen.
fluoroscopic screen a phosphorescent screen that shows the movement and relationship of organs and structures in fluoroscopy.
intensifying screen a fluorescent screen used in conjunction with x-ray film to enhance the effect of the radiation and reduce dosage to the patient. The screen must be matched to the emissivity range; the emissivity of phosphorus is similar to that of the human eye, so that phosphors absorb x-ray energy and convert it to visible light.
tangent screen a large square of black cloth with a central mark for fixation; used with a campimeter in mapping the field of vision.

screen

(skrēn),
1. A sheet of any substance used to shield an object from any influence, such as heat, light, or x-rays.
See also: screen memory.
2. A sheet on which an image is projected.
See also: screen memory.
3. Formerly, to make a fluoroscopic examination.
See also: screen memory.
4. In psychoanalysis, concealment, as one image or memory concealing another.
See also: screen memory.
5. To examine, evaluate; to process a group to select or separate certain individuals from it.
6. A thin layer of crystals that converts x-rays to light photons to expose film; used in a cassette to produce radiographic images on film.
[Fr. écran]

screen

(skrēn)
1. a structure resembling a curtain or partition, used as a protection or shield, e.g., against excessive radiation exposure.
2. a large flat surface upon which light rays are projected.
3. protective (2).
4. to examine by fluoroscopy (Great Britain).
5. to separate well individuals in a population from those with an undiagnosed pathologic condition by means of tests, examinations, or other procedures.

skin screen  a substance applied to the skin to protect it from the sun's rays or other noxious agents.
solar screen , sun screen sunscreen.

screen

(skrēn)
n.
1. A movable device that serves to protect, conceal, or divide.
2. A surface or device on which an image is displayed for viewing.
3. A screen memory.
v.
1. To process a group of people in order to select or separate certain individuals from it.
2. To test or examine for the presence of disease or infection.
3. To subject to genetic screening.

screen

Molecular biology
verb To detect a phenotype’s presence or absence by testing for growth under different conditions (e.g., plus and minus an auxotrophic supplement or permissive and non-permissive conditions), usually done by replica plating or patching colonies onto each type of plate.
 
Public health
noun
(1) Any systematic activity—e.g., measuring BP, glucose or cholesterol; pap smear; or other activity—which attempts to identify a particular disease in persons in a particular population.
(2) A popular term for a solar protection barrier.

screen

Public health
1. Any systematic activity–eg, measuring BP, glucose or cholesterol, pap smear, or other activity, which attempts to identify a particular disease in persons in a particular population. See Drug screen, General health screen, Laxative screen, Memory Impairment screen, Metabolic screen, Neonatal screen.
2. A solar protection barrier. See Sunscreen.

screen

(skrēn)
1. A sheet of any substance used to shield an object from any influence (e.g., heat, light, x-rays).
2. A sheet on which an image is projected.
3. psychoanalysis Concealment, as one image or memory concealing another.
See also: screen memory
4. To examine, evaluate; to process a group to select or separate certain individuals from it.
5. A thin layer of crystals that converts x-rays to light photons to expose film; used in a cassette to produce radiographic images on film.
6. To examine for the presence or absence of specified characteristics to determine whether further examination is needed.
[Fr. écran]

screen,

n initial examination to determine the existence of a disease or disorder.

screen

(skrēn)
1. A sheet of any substance used to shield an object from any influence, such as heat, light, or x-rays.
2. A sheet on which an image is projected.
3. To examine, evaluate; to process a group to select or separate some individuals from it.
Synonym(s): screening (1).
[Fr. écran]

screen

1. a framework or agent used as a shield or protector.
2. to examine.

fast screen
permits big reduction in exposure to x-ray beam.
screen film
prepared to be used with intensifying screens. The standard film and marketed as being of standard, fast or ultrafast speeds.
rare-earth screen
see rare-earth intensifying screen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Vibration is also used at the front end of mixed C&D systems, as with Sherbrooke's vibrating apron screens, which the company often offers as an alternative to trommel screens.
A fine screen after the coarse screen separates small papers or other components that succeeded in passing through the screen apertures from the paper stream.
If 1 doesn't shoot or make a pass to 3 or 2, he can continue the offense by passing to 4 and receiving a back screen from 2 to restart the action (Diag.
As it does, makers of big, high-resolution TV screens are feverishly exploring technologies to gain a competitive edge.
n Model Inn, Quay Street: 11am to 2am, big screen, rolls served.
So impressed were students and administrators that they have opted to add a fourth screen this month to the area that includes the campus business center and satellite bookstore, a locale used largely by working professionals who take classes.
Traditionally, screen packs are inserted with the coarsest screen against the breaker plate and the finest screen facing the screw.
Not overtly erotic, the screen tests nonetheless speak sexuality, just as telephone books or actuarial tables do; any artifact numbingly antithetical to physical pleasure articulates the space for a prurient counterreaction.
Great care must be taken, for example, to coat the screen phosphors uniformly during manufacture.
During that time, it will install 700 new screens, an average of a dozen per site, and close down 500 older auditoriums.
Casting quality requirements are forcing foundries into tighter process controls that include screen distribution of purchased sands.
In 2006 alone, Third Screen Media added more than 50 publishers to its TSM|Network and two worldwide agencies as charter MADX|Agency customers, together helping to bring hundreds of mobile advertising campaigns from global brands across multiple industries to more than 10 million consumers.