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score

 [skor]
a rating, usually expressed numerically, based on specific achievement or the degree to which certain qualities are manifest.
APACHE score (acute physiological assessment and chronic health evaluation) a widely used method for assessing severity of illness in acutely ill patients in intensive care units, taking into account a variety of routine physiological parameters.
Apgar score a numerical expression of an infant's condition at birth, based on heart rate, respiratory effort, muscle tone, reflex irritability, and color; see also apgar score.
Bishop score a score for estimating the prospects of induction of labor, arrived at by evaluating the extent of cervical dilatation, effacement, the station of the fetal head, consistency of the cervix, and the cervical position in relation to the vaginal axis.
Silverman-Andersen score a system for evaluating the breathing of premature infants; see also Silverman-Andersen score.
stroke score any of various scoring systems that seek to characterize a patient's clinical state following a stroke.
trauma score a rating system used in the evaluation of patients with traumatic injury. Scores range from 1 to 15, with lower scores being associated with higher mortality rates.

score

(skōr),
An evaluation, usually expressed numerically, of status, achievement, or condition in a given set of circumstances.
[M. E. scor, notch, tally]

score

(skor) a rating, usually expressed numerically, based on specific achievement or the degree to which certain qualities or conditions are present.
APACHE score  [a cute p hysiological a ssessment and c hronic h ealth e valuation] a widely-used method for assessing severity of illness in acutely ill patients in intensive care units, taking into account a variety of routine physiological parameters.
Apgar score  a numerical expression of an infant's condition, usually determined at 60 seconds after birth, based on heart rate, respiratory effort, muscle tone, reflex irritability, and color.
Bishop score  a score for estimating the prospects of induction of labor, arrived at by evaluating the extent of cervical dilatation, effacement, the station of the fetal head, consistency of the cervix, and the cervical position in relation to the vaginal axis.

score

Drug slang
verb A regional term meaning to purchase or receive illicit drugs.

Health legislation
noun A report by the Congressional Budget Office that evaluates the economic impact of legislation (e.g., that of healthcare reform). The score obtained may determine the fate of a legislative proposal.

Molecular biology
verb To screen for a phenotype by testing for growth under different conditions (e.g., plus and minus an auxotrophic supplement, or permissive and nonpermissive conditions) usually done by replica plating or patching colonies onto each type of plate.
 
Pharmacology
verb To place a transverse linear attenuation on a flat cylindrical pill to facilitate breaking it in half.
 
Vox populi
noun A numeric rating of a particular process.

score

noun Health legislation Economic impact report A report by the Congressional Budget Office that evaluates the economic impact of legislation–eg, that of health care reform; the score obtained via projective prestidigitation may determine the fate of a legislative proposal. See Scorecard, Scorekeeper. Cf Report card Vox populi A numeric rating of a particular process. See APGAR score, Apopnea-hypopnea score, ASIA motor score, Borg score, Child-Pugh score, DeMeester score, Fagerstrom tolerance score, Family Environment score, Gleason score, Hachinski ischemic score, Hegsted's score, Lod score, Longitudinality score, Mayo risk score, Medicus modified score, Modified Bournemouth score, Nursing Classification score, Pediatric trauma score, Pittsburgh brainstem score, PRISM score, QRS score, Revised Trauma score, Sanitation score, SAPS II, Trauma score, Z score, Z score verb Drug slang To purchase illicit drugs Vox populi To get a home run; to get lucky.

score

(skōr)
An evaluation, usually expressed numerically, of status, achievement, or condition in a given set of circumstances.
[M. E. scor, notch, tally]

score

a rating, usually expressed numerically, based on specific achievement or the degree to which certain qualities are manifest.
References in classic literature ?
I have a dim memory of the foot of a Martian coming down within a score of yards of my head, driving straight into the loose gravel, whirling it this way and that and lifting again; of a long suspense, and then of the four carry- ing the debris of their comrade between them, now clear and then presently faint through a veil of smoke, receding interminably, as it seemed to me, across a vast space of river and meadow.
Now and again this king, whose name does not matter, would mount a ring-streaked horse and ride scores of miles to Simlatown to confer with the lieutenant-governor on matters of state, or assure the viceroy that his sword was at the service of the queen-empress.
There were scores of verses, for he worked the Dreadnought every mile of the way between Liverpool and New York as conscientiously as though he were on her deck, and the accordion pumped and the fiddle squeaked beside him.
Scores of persons have deliriously found themselves made parties in Jarndyce and Jarndyce without knowing how or why; whole families have inherited legendary hatreds with the suit.
As for mine host, he knew how to keep a still tongue in his head, and to swallow his words before they passed his teeth, for he knew very well which side of his bread was spread with butter, for Robin and his band were the best of customers and paid their scores without having them chalked up behind the door.
He had seen men and animals die, and into the field of his vision, by scores, came such deaths.
Port Adams is a salt-water village on Malaita, and Malaita is the most savage island in the Solomons--so savage that no traders or planters have yet gained a foothold on it; while, from the time of the earliest bˆche-de-mer fishers and sandalwood traders down to the latest labor recruiters equipped with automatic rifles and gasolene engines, scores of white adventurers have been passed out by tomahawks and soft-nosed Snider bullets.
She broke the hearts of scores of our young comrades, and scores of others she captured, and by their heart-strings led into our organization.
Arthur, after two narrow escapes, scores one, and Johnson gets the ball.
There they lay in their triangular oaken vaults, each mariner a chiselled muteness; a score of lamps flashing upon his hooded eyes.
If he were Admiral Hawke he shall pay his score," cried Silver; and then, relinquishing my hand, "Who did you say he was?
At this a score of idlers reached him their staves--being ready enough to see another man have his head cracked, even if they wished to save their own--and he took the stoutest and heaviest of all.