scombroid poisoning


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Related to scombroid poisoning: Ciguatera poisoning, Paralytic shellfish poisoning

scom·broid poi·son·ing

poisoning from ingestion of heat-stable toxins produced by bacterial action on inadequately or improperly preserved dark-meat fish of the order Scombroidea (for example, tuna, bonito, mackerel, albacore, skipjack); characterized by epigastric pain, nausea and vomiting, headache, thirst, difficulty in swallowing, and urticaria.

scombroid poisoning

n.
Poisoning caused by ingesting fish containing scombrotoxin, especially scombroids such as tuna or mackerel. It is characterized by flushing, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, headache, and hives. Also called scombrotoxin poisoning.

scombroid poisoning

toxic effects of eating scombroid fish (such as bonito or tuna) that have begun bacterial decomposition after being caught. Scombroid fish contain large amounts of free histidine in the muscle tissue, which gives rise to toxic levels of histamine under conditions of histidine decarboxylation by any of a dozen species of bacteria. Scombroid poisoning is not limited to consumption of fresh fish; the problem also may affect commercially canned tuna. Symptoms, which usually last no more than 24 hours, include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, epigastric pain, and urticaria.

scom·broid poi·son·ing

(skom'broyd poy'zŏn-ing)
Poisoning from ingestion of heat-stable toxins produced by bacterial action on inadequately preserved dark-meat fish of the order Scombroidea (tuna, bonito, mackerel, albacore, skipjack); characterized by epigastric pain, nausea and vomiting, headache, thirst, difficulty in swallowing, and urticaria.

scombroid poisoning

A condition believed to be caused by heat-stable toxin that develops in the muscles of red meat fish, such as tuna, that have been stored without adequate refrigeration. There is a bitter taste in the mouth, a wide-spread rash, a feeling of hotness, a fast pulse rate and sometimes diarrhoea and wheezing. These effects usually settle within 12 hours. Antihistamine drugs speed up recovery but the condition is not an allergy to fish.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hwang DF, Chang SH, Shiau CY and CC Cheng Biogenic amines in the flesh of sailfish (Istiophorus platypherus) responsible for scombroid poisoning.
Scombroid poisoning occurs when bacteria (which should be killed by correct smoking) multiply in fish that's not fresh and produce high levels of a chemical called histamine.
The first step for tuna processors, for example, is to ensure the fish were adequately chilled on the boat and didn't stay at sea too long because scombroid poisoning can occur if tuna even slightly decomposes.
Scombroid poisoning comes from histamine that can form on the flesh of fresh tuna, mahi mahi, and some other fish that aren't kept cold enough (usually before they reach the store).
According to a report before Warwick District Council's health and control committee next week, food safety chiefs traced the symptoms to scombroid poisoning, which is caused by the ingestion of foods containing high levels of histamine and other harmful bacteria.