sclerotium

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sclerotium

 [sklĕ-ro´she-um]
a hard blackish mass formed by certain fungi, as ergot.

scle·ro·ti·um

, pl.

scle·ro·ti·a

(sklē-rō'shē-ŭm, -shē-ă),
1. In fungi, a variably sized resting body composed of a hardened mass of hyphae with or without host tissue, usually with a darkened rind, from which fruit bodies, stromata, conidiophores, or mycelia may develop.
2. The hardened resting condition of the plasmodium of Myxomycetes.

sclerotium

/scle·ro·ti·um/ (sklĕ-ro´she-um) a structure formed by fungi and certain protozoa in response to adverse environmental conditions, which will germinate under favorable conditions; in fungi, it is a hard mass of intertwined mycelia, usually with pigmented walls, and in protozoa it is a multinucleated hard cyst into which the plasmodium divides.

sclerotium

  1. a resting stage in many fungi. It takes the form of a ball of HYPHAE varying in size from a pinhead to a football, and usually has a hard, dark-coloured exterior coating. Fruiting bodies may be formed eventually from the sclerotium (either sexual or asexual) or a MYCELIUM may form. Normally the sclerotium does not contain spores.
  2. the firm resting condition of a myxomycete. see MYXOMYCOTA.

sclerotium

pl. sclerotia; a hard blackish mass of mycelia formed during the resting phase by certain fungi, as Claviceps purpurea.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, vitamin A inhibits sclerotial formation in Aspergillus flavus.
Singh SK, Dhar BL, Verma RN (1999) Mass production of carpogenic sclerotial spawn in Morchella esculenta- An attempt at its domestication.
Sporidesmium sclerotivorum: distribution and function in natural biological control of sclerotial fungi.
Duran RM, Cary JW and M Calvo Production of cyclopiozonic acid, aflatrem and aflatoxin by Aspergillus flavus is regulated by veA, a gene necessary for sclerotial formation.
The complete inhibition of the sclerotial formation by the pathogen in the test plates was found with T.
Factors affecting sclerotial germination of Sclerotium cepivoruta, secondary sclerotia formation and germination stimulants to reduce inoculum density.
PHOTO : Peanut stems showing typical symptoms of Sclerotinia infection including fluffy white mycelia, black sclerotial bodies, and tan lesions.
Wide host ranges and sclerotial longevity limit the effectiveness of crop rotation as a means of control for Sclerotinia blight (Goldman et al.