sclerema neonatorum


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sclerema

 [sklĕ-re´mah]
induration of the subcutaneous fat.
sclerema adipo´sum (sclerema neonato´rum) diffuse, waxlike hardening of the skin and subcutaneous tissue that occurs in premature and debilitated infants during the first weeks of life, usually associated with an underlying condition such as sepsis, congenital heart disease, respiratory distress, or severe dehydration. As it progresses, the skin becomes cold, mottled, yellow to white, and stony hard. The prognosis is poor if it becomes generalized. Called also edema neonatorum.

scle·re·ma ne·o·na·to·rum

sclerema appearing at birth or in early infancy, usually in premature and hypothermic infants, as sharply demarcated and yellowish white indurated plaques that usually involve the cheeks, buttocks, shoulders, and calves; subcutaneous fat has a high proportion of saturated fatty acids; microscopically, there is thickening of interlobular fibrous tissue and formation of triglyceride crystals and foreign body giant cells; prognosis is poor for widespread lesions, but localized lesions may resolve slowly over a period of many months.

sclerema neonatorum

[sklirē′mə]
Etymology: Gk, skleros + neos, new; L, natus, birth
a progressive generalized hardening of the skin and subcutaneous tissue of the newborn. It is usually a fatal condition that results from severe cold stress in severely ill premature infants subject to such life-threatening conditions as metabolic acidosis, hypoglycemia, GI or respiratory infection, or gross malformation. Also called scleredema neonatorum, sclerema adiposum, scleroderma neonatorum.

scle·re·ma ne·o·na·to·rum

(skler-ē'mă nē-ō'nā-tō'rum)
Sclerema appearing at birth or in early infancy, usually in premature and hypothermic infants, as sharply demarcated and yellowish-white indurated plaques that usually involve the cheeks, buttocks, shoulders, and calves; subcutaneous fat has a high proportion of saturated fatty acids; microscopically, there is thickening of interlobular fibrous tissue and formation of triglyceride crystals and foreign body giant cells; prognosis is poor for widespread lesions, but localized lesions may resolve slowly over a period of many months.