sclerema


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Related to sclerema: Scleroderma, scleroderma neonatorum

sclerema

 [sklĕ-re´mah]
induration of the subcutaneous fat.
sclerema adipo´sum (sclerema neonato´rum) diffuse, waxlike hardening of the skin and subcutaneous tissue that occurs in premature and debilitated infants during the first weeks of life, usually associated with an underlying condition such as sepsis, congenital heart disease, respiratory distress, or severe dehydration. As it progresses, the skin becomes cold, mottled, yellow to white, and stony hard. The prognosis is poor if it becomes generalized. Called also edema neonatorum.

scle·re·ma

(sklĕ-rē'mă), Do not confuse this word with scleredema or scleroderma.
Induration of subcutaneous fat.
[scler- + edema]

sclerema

/scle·re·ma/ (sklĕ-re´mah) a severe, sometimes fatal disorder of adipose tissue occurring chiefly in preterm, sick, debilitated infants, manifested by induration of the involved tissue, causing the skin to become cold, yellowish white, mottled, boardlike, and inflexible.

scle·re·ma

(skler-ē'mă)
Induration of subcutaneous fat.

sclerema

induration of the subcutaneous fat.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sclerema neonatorum and subcutaneous fat necrosis of the newborn in the same infant.
On the fourth day of hospital stay after her second transfusion, her general condition started to improve; she became alert but the sclerema persisted.
The major observation of this case report is the development of sclerema in association with septic shock on two occasions in two successive hospitalizations in this severely-malnourished young infant who was also treated successfully with blood transfusions in addition to appropriate antibiotics, intravenous fluid, inotropes, correction of electrolyte imbalance, supplementation of micronutrients, vitamins and minerals, and therapeutic diet (13).
We do not have a ready explanation why this infant had two consecutive episodes of sclerema in two successive admissions in the hospital.
Moreover, the infant had hypoxaemia and metabolic disturbances, which could further increase the ratio possibly by enzymatic alterations, resulting in precipitation of fatty acid crystals, primarily of triglycerides within the lipocytes, leading to the dramatic clinical findings of sclerema (5,15).
Clinicians should be vigilant to look for fatal sclerema in severely-malnourished young infants with overwhelming sepsis even in successive hospitalizations, and such young infants should be managed with blood transfusion, broad-spectrum antibiotics, correction of electrolyte imbalance, in addition to other routine management of malnutrition.
Sclerema neonatorum associated with systemic fibrosis and endocardial fibroelastosis.
Exchange transfusion in severe neonatal infection with sclerema.
Sclerema neonatorum: a review of nomenclature, clinical presentation, histological features, differential diagnoses and management.
Involvement of trunk, buttocks and thighs together with rapid evolution after birth is typical of incontinentia pigmenti6 and sclerema neonatorum.