scintillator

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scin·til·la·tor

(sin'ti-lā'tŏr, -tōr),
A substance that emits visible light when hit by a subatomic particle or by an x-ray or gamma ray.
See also: scintillation counter.

scin·til·la·tor

(sin'ti-lā-tŏr)
A substance that emits visible light when hit by a subatomic particle x-ray or gamma ray.
See also: scintillation counter
References in periodicals archive ?
In this paper, I focus on that scintillators and scintillation detectors.
Increased use of plastic scintillators in applications requiring high performance
This excellent PSD capability is what makes this new scintillator unique among the plastic scintillators and is a welcome feature from the point of neutron detection and identification in the presence of gamma-ray background.
Behind that is another gadolinium orthosilicate scintillator capable of detecting gamma rays, which are high-energy photons more penetrating than X-rays.
Teijin Chemicals believes that SCINTIREX will help to reduce the total cost of radiation detectors by slashing the production cost of scintillators to one tenth or less of current levels.
Both properties are relevant to plastic scintillators.
The topics include the real-time imaging of the electrical field distribution in CdZnTe at low temperature, modeling the crystal growth of CdZnTe, growing boron carbide crystals from a copper flux, scintillating metal organic frameworks as a new class of radiation detection materials, the opto-electrical characterization and x-ray mapping of large-volume CdZnTe radiation detectors, and the synthesis and structures of elpasolite halide scintillators.
Higher-performance scintillators are more expensive, harder to manufacture, and fragile; scintillators that are less costly, easier to manufacture, and more rugged offer lower performance.
It's less toxic than most chemical liquid scintillators.
Cosmic-ray events are vetoed by the veto scintillators shown in Fig.
When used with scintillators, such as cesium iodide, that absorb X-rays efficiently and emit visible light near the peak of the spectral sensitivity of silicon, photodiodes made of amorphous silicon can function as charge storage devices.
Zinsser Analytic, for instance, promotes the solvents on which its aptly named Quicksafe scintillators are based as "nontoxic, biodegradable, odorless" and its scintillators themselves as "pleasant to use and easy to store and transport.